Mikrotik stacking switches. MikroTik CRS125-24G-1S-2HnD-IN Twenty-four Gigabit…

Switch Stacks

Cisco Meraki switches allow you to configure anything from a single port to thousands of ports through our Cloud-managed Dashboard. In addition, Meraki switches now allow for physical stacking on select switch models. So you can easily manage all of your switches and get physical redundancy in the deployments that need it.

Learn more with this free online training course on the Meraki Learning Hub:

Determining How to Stack

Stacking to Fit your Network

Meraki Switches have multiple options to best fit your network deployment. This article discusses the MS stacking features that can be leveraged to best suit your deployment, specifically: Virtual Stacking, Physical Stacking, and Flexible Stacking.

Understanding Virtual Stacking

With the MS product, it’s very easy to manage and deploy hundreds of ports on a network. This is made possible via the use of Virtual Stacking, which is the ability to easily push configuration to hundreds of ports in the network regardless of where the switches are physically located.

By entering a simple filter, a network administrator can easily modify the required ports in just a few clicks.

Understanding Physical Stacking

Physical Stacking helps provide easy management and physical redundancy. Utilizing two physical stacking ports on the back of each switch, a stack can provide for gateway redundancy at layer 3 and dual-homing redundancy at layer 2. Only a single uplink is required to provide connectivity to the stack once all stacking cables are installed.

A step-by-step guide for configuring a physical switch stack can be found in the section of this article, Configuring a Physical Switch Stack.

When a new switch stack is created, or a new switch is added to an existing stack, the below configurations will be removed from the stand-alone switch(es) and will need to be reconfigured on the stack:

  • Link aggregates
  • Mirrored ports
  • SVIs
  • IGMP snooping (if switch specific settings are configured)
  • MTU size (if switch specific settings are configured)
  • STP priority (if switch specific settings are configured)

Features like the ones above run one instance for the entire switch. When a stack is created, you are combining multiple physical switches all running their own instances of the feature to a single logical switch, which is why some features need to be reconfigured.

Understanding Flexible Stacking

Availability and redundancy are most helpful at the distribution layer of a network. On MS420 and MS425 series switches, any two ports can be configured as stack ports. This allows for full redundancy setup for your gateway and minimizes the impact of a failure in the network.

To achieve flexible stacking, select two ports on each switch and enable the stacking option:

A step-by-step guide for configuring a flexible switch stack can be found in the section of this article, Configuring a Flexible Switch Stack.

Stacking Availability

Unless specifically noted, only like-models, regardless of port density, can be stacked. For example, MS350-48 and MS350-24X can be stacked, but MS250-48 cannot be stacked with an MS350-48.

For switches that support Physical/Flexible Stacking:

For full information about stacking cable compatibility, available options, and product IDs, see the Stacking Cables section of the SFP and Stacking Accessories datasheet.

Configuring a Physical Switch Stack

Up to eight Meraki MS switches can be configured in a physical stack to allow for high-speed communication between devices.

Only like-models can be stacked. For example, MS350-48 and MS350-24X can be stacked, but MS250-48 cannot be stacked with a MS350-48. The only exception is that MS210 and MS225 models can be members of the same stack.

Physical stacking is available on MS210, MS225, MS250, MS350, MS355, MS390, MS410, and MS450 switches, which include dedicated stacking ports. This section describes physical stacking.

Flexible stacking is available on MS420 and MS425 switches which do not have dedicated stacking ports; any port on these switches can be configured as a stack port. For flexible stacking, check the Configuring a Flexible Switch Stack section of this article.

Physical Switch Stack Configuration Steps

The steps below explain how to prepare a group of switches for physical stacking, how to stack them together, and how to configure the stack in Dashboard.

  • Add the switches into a Dashboard network. This can be a new Dashboard network for these switches, or an existing network with other switches. Do not configure the stack in Dashboard yet.
  • With all switches powered off and links disconnected, connect the switches together via stacking cables in a ring topology (as shown in the following image). To create a full ring, start by connecting switch 1/stack port 1 to switch 2/stack port 2, then switch 2/stack port 1 to switch 3/stack port 2 and so forth, with the bottom switch connecting to the top switch to complete the ring.

Connect a single uplink from 1 switch of the stack. Power on all the switches, then waits several minutes for them to download the latest firmware and updates from Dashboard. The switches may reboot during this process.

  • The power LEDs on the front of each switch will blink during this process.
  • Once the switches are done downloading and installing the firmware, their power LEDs will stay solid white or green.

Configure the switch stack in Dashboard. If Dashboard has already detected the correct stack under Detected potential stacks, click Provision this stack to automatically configure the stack.

NOTE: If you have opted into the MS AutoStacking Early Access beta Dashboard will automatically attempt to provision detected potential stacks for you. This has the same effect as clicking the Provision this stack button, and Dashboard will only attempt this once. If Dashboard is unable to auto provision the stack, the switches will appear on the same page in the Detected stacks that failed auto provisioning section, and the stack will need to be manually provisioned using the Provision this stack button once the cause of the provisioning failure has been fixed.

Creating a stack manually

If Dashboard does not detect the potential stack, you can configure the stack manually. Navigate to Switch Monitor Switch stacks. Click the link to add one or the Add a stack button, depending on the option available:

Next, select the checkboxes of the switches you would like to stack, enter a name for the stack, and click Create.

Validate the switches are now successfully stacked via Monitor Switch Stacks

If unsuccessful, review and correct the error and reattempt provisioning.

NOTE: After the switch stack is up and running, multiple uplinks can be added for redundancy.

Stacking MS390s

Follow the steps below to setup a MS390 stack or watch this short video.

  • Add the switches into a Dashboard network. This can be a new Dashboard network for these switches, or an existing network with other switches. Do not configure the stack in Dashboard yet.
  • With all switches powered off and links disconnected, connect the switches together via stacking cables in a ring topology (as shown in the following image). To create a full ring, start by connecting switch 1/stack port 1 to switch 2/stack port 2, then switch 2/stack port 1 to switch 3/stack port 2 and so forth, with the bottom switch connecting to the top switch to complete the ring. While connecting the stacking cables, ensure that each connector is correctly aligned to the switch’s stacking port it is connecting to and finger-tighten the screws (clockwise direction). Make sure the Cisco logo is on the top side of the connector.
  • Connect oneuplink for the entire switch stack. Power on all the switches, then waits several minutes for them to download the latest firmware and updates from Dashboard. The switches may reboot during this process.
  • Download the same firmware build (that includes support for MS390) using the Firmware Upgrade Manager under Organization Monitor Firmware Upgrades, if they are not already set for this. This helps ensure each switch is running the same firmware build. Please note that it might take close to an hour for the switches to upgrade.
  • Navigate to Switch Monitor Switch stacks
  • Configure the switch stack in Dashboard. If Dashboard has already detected the correct stack under Detected potential stacks, click Provision this stack to automatically configure the stack. Otherwise, click the link to add one or the Add a stack button, depending on the option available:

It is expected that not all MS390 member switches will appear online until the stack is fully configured in the dashboard, as instructed in step 6.

The MS AutoStacking Early Access beta applies to MS390s as well, please see the note above regarding auto provisioning.

  • Select the checkboxes of the switches you would like to stack, name the stack, and then click Create.

Ensure that all switches have downloaded the latest configuration. To verify this, navigate to Switch Switches and select the MS390 switch. Look for ‘CONFIG’ in the column on the left of the switch details page and check if the status reads ‘Up to date’.

  • Each stack member will show the same management IP address on the dashboard as there is only one control plane running on the primary or master switch. When using static IP addressing on the MS390 for switch management interfaces rather than DHCP, it is recommended to set the same management IP on all stack members once the stack is formed and online. This ensures that the management IP address remains consistent in the event of a failure of the stack master switch. If a member switch is removed from the stack, or the stack is broken, the IP configuration should be modified to unique IP addresses per switch. This addressing change should be made prior to unstacking or removing a member switch.
  • Based on the number of the members in a stack and ports being used boot time can vary.
  • Rebooting a stack member from dashboard using the Reboot device tool will reboot all the members in a stack. The same applies when performing a factory reset on a stack member.
  • Physically power cycling switch stack members may cause other stack members to be unreachable for a short time, while the management plane re-initializes.

Adding a new member to the stack

  • Add the new switch into a Dashboard network of the existing MS390 stack.
  • Connect the new switch to an uplink to bring it online and ensure it checks in with the Meraki Dashboard.
  • Upgrade the switch to the same firmware build as that running on the switch stack, using the Firmware Upgrade Manager under Organization Monitor Firmware Upgrades,
  • Before adding the new member to an existing stack make sure the total number of VLANs is limited to 1000. E.g If you have an existing stack with each port set to Native VLAN 1, 1-1000 and the new member ports are set to native VLAN 1; allowed VLANs: 1,2001-2500 then your total number of VLAN in the stack will be 1000(1-1000)500(2001-2500) = 1500. Dashboard will not allow the new member to be added to the stack and will show the following error:
  • Navigate to Switch Switch stacks and select the existing stack you want to add the switch to.
  • Check that the switches in the existing stack have all fetched the new configuration. To verify this, navigate to Switch Switches and select an MS390 switch in the stack. Look for ‘CONFIG’ in the column on the left of the switch details page and check if the status reads ‘Up to date’.
  • Under “Manage members” tab add the new switch to the existing stack.
  • Power off the switch and physically stack the new switch to the existing stack in a ring fashion.
  • Power on the new member.

Note: Please ensure to remove any layer 3 interface from a switch, before attempting to add it as a new member to a stack with existing layer 3 interfaces. If not, you will get the following error: ERROR Cannot add a switch with layer 3 interfaces to a stack with layer 3 interfaces.

Configuring a Flexible Switch Stack

Up to eight Meraki MS420/425 switches can be configured in a flexible stack to allow for high-speed communication between devices.

Flexible stacking is available on MS420 and MS425 switches, which do not have dedicated stacking ports. Any SFP interface on these switches can be configured as a stack port. On the MS425, the QSFP ports can also be configured as stack ports. Please note that 10 Gb/s is the minimum speed required to support flexible stacking. This section describes flexible stacking.

Only like-models can be stacked. For example, MS350-48 and MS350-24X can be stacked, but MS250-48 cannot be stacked with a MS350-48.

Physical stacking is available on MS210, MS225, MS250, MS350, MS355, MS390, MS410, and MS450 switches, which include dedicated stacking ports. For physical stacking, check the Configuring a Physical Switch Stack section of this article.

On the MS420 and MS425 series switches, you have the flexibility to use any of the front ports as either ethernet (default) or stacking. This option is available under the port configuration and can be easily modified by just selecting enable from the dropdown.

Converting a link aggregate to a stacking port is not a supported configuration and may result in unexpected behavior.

Once this configuration is made and the switches have downloaded the new configuration it’s recommended to follow a similar ring topology as mentioned above for the overall port cabling. Ports configured as stack ports will show up with a new symbol on the nodes status page to indicate that it’s configured for stacking.

Flexible Switch Stack Configuration Steps

The following steps explain how to prepare a group of switches for flexible stacking, how to stack them together, and how to configure the stack in Dashboard:

  • Add the switches into a Dashboard network. This can be a new Dashboard network for these switches, or an existing network with other switches. Do not configure the stack in Dashboard yet.
  • Connect an uplink to each switch. Ensure that the uplink ports are different than the intended stacking ports.
  • Power on all the switches, then wait several minutes for them to download the latest firmware and updates from Dashboard. The switches may reboot during this process.
  • The power LEDs on the front of each switch will blink during this process.
  • Once the switches are done downloading and installing firmware, their power LEDs will stay solid white or green.
  • Choose (but do not yet connect) two ports per switch to be the dedicated stacking ports. Switch stacks should be connected in a ring topology (as shown in the following image). Ensure that the stacking ports are different than the switch uplink port. Do not actually connect the ports yet. This will be done in Step 6.

It is recommended to configure and use identical port types as flexible stacking ports. For example, 2 x 10Gb/s (SFP) or 2 x 40Gb/s (QSFP) interfaces can be connected together as flexible stacking ports.

Please note that 10 Gb/s is the minimum speed required to support flexible stacking.

  • Configure the intended ports for stacking in Dashboard under Switching Monitor Switch ports:
  • Connect the switch stack via the intended stacking ports like the image shown in step 4.
  • Navigate to Switch Monitor Switch stacks.
  • Configure the switch stack in Dashboard. If Dashboard has already detected the correct stack under Detected potential stacks, click Provision this stack to automatically configure the stack. Otherwise, to configure the stack manually:

The MS AutoStacking Early Access beta applies to flexible switch stacks as well, please see the note above regarding auto provisioning.

  • Navigate to Switch Monitor Switch stacks.
  • Click add one /Add a stack:
  • Select the checkboxes of the switches you would like to stack, name the stack, and then click Create.:

Viewing and Creating your Stacks

The Switch Stacks Page gives you quick access to all of the configured stacks in the network as well as provides easy configuration options for new Stacks that are being deployed. Clicking on Add a stack or when there is a detected stack you’ll be able to easily configure a new physical stack.

Check the Health of the Stack

Viewing a Stack

In order to check the stack status visually simply click any row on the Stacks List. This will take you to the Overview of the stack selected. From here you can easily get a feel for connected ports and which switches are contained in the stack. We’ve included the capability to blink the LEDs on switches in the stack to easily indicate which switch it is for anyone who’s on site looking at the stack.

Managing Stack Members

To add or remove Stack Members simply click on the Manage Members tab and select the switch/es that you want to add or remove from the stack and click either add or remove switches.

Viewing Switch Stack Role info

When using physical or flexible stacking, one switch in the stack acts as the active switch, managing all of the stack functions such as spanning-tree. It may occasionally be useful to understand which switch is the active switch and which are stack members.

Beginning with MS 15.18, the stack role is displayed on the switch details page for an individual switch accessed from the Switching Switches page if the switch in question belongs to a switch stack. The switch stack section of the left hand column displays one of three stack roles:

MS switches other than the MS390 have one active switch in the stack and all other switches are member switches. MS390 stacks also have one standby switch. The standby becomes the active unit in the event of a failure of that switch.

Replacing and Cloning Stack Members

The steps below should be used for the following use cases:

  • Replacing a Stack Member
  • A stacked switch has failed and needs to be replaced.
  • A stacked switch needs to be replaced in a stack with 8 switches.
  • A stacked switch needs to be replaced, but the new switch should be up and running before the replacement occurs.
  • A new switch needs to be added and requires the same port configurations of another stack member.

Note: All the following instructions are the same for both physical and flexible switch stacks.

Replacing a Stack Member

The following steps will clone the original stack member and remove it from the stack:

  • Power off the stack member to be replaced
  • Claim the new/replacement switch in the inventory:
  • Navigate to Organization Inventory
  • Click the Claim button
  • Enter the serial number of the new switch. If replacing multiple members, list all serials
  • Click Claim
  • Add the switch to the network containing the stack
  • Select the switch to be added to the network
  • Click Add to.
  • Select the network and Add to existing

Note: After the switch has been added to the network and before it is added to the stack or replaced, it should be brought online individually and updated to the same firmware build as the rest of the stack. Failing to do so can prevent the switch from stacking successfully. The configured firmware build for the network can be verified under Organization Firmware Upgrades. A flashing white or green LED on the status light on the switch indicates that a firmware upgrade is in progress.

  • (Optional) Edit the name of the new switch
  • Navigate to Switch Switches
  • Select the new switch
  • Click the next to the title to rename the switch
  • Clone and replace the stack member
  • Navigate to Switch Switch stacks
  • Select the existing stack
  • Navigate to the Clone and replace member tab
  • Select the source switch to be replaced
  • Select the destination switch which will replace the source switch

The old switch can then be repurposed as a standalone switch or removed from the network

Cloning a Stack Member

The following steps will clone the original stack member without removing it from the stack.

  • Claim the new/replacement switch in the inventory:
  • Navigate to Organization Inventory
  • Click the Claim button
  • Enter the serial number of the new switch. If replacing multiple members, list all serials
  • Click Claim
  • Add the switch to the network containing the stack
  • Select the switch to be added to the network
  • Click Add to.
  • Select the network and Add to existing
  • (Optional) Edit the name of the new switch
  • Navigate to Switch Switches
  • Select the new switch
  • Click the next to the title to rename the switch
  • Clone the stack member
  • Navigate to Switch Switches
  • Select the replacement switch
  • Click Clone.
  • Add the new switch to a stack.
  • Navigate to Switch Switch stacks
  • Select the existing stack
  • Navigate to the Manage members tab. In the Add members section, select the switch to add

Switch Replacement Walkthrough for Stacks Bound to a Template

Below are instructions for how to copy configurations from a failed switch that is part of a stack and where the network is bound to a template.

  • On the Organization Configure Inventory page, claim the new switch and then add the new switch to the existing network.
  • Bind new switch to the switch template.
  • Navigate to the parent template in Dashboard.
  • Navigate to Switch Configure Switch templates within that template.
  • Click on the corresponding template.
  • Click the Bind switches button.
  • Click the checkbox next to the new switch and click the Bind to profile button.
  • Firmware upgrade for the new switch.
  • Provide the new switch a physical uplink connection and then power it on. The new switch needs to be brought online as a standalone device, not yet added to the stack so that it can update its firmware.
  • Confirm via the connectivity graph or Support that the switch has upgraded its firmware.
  • While the new switch upgrades, you may proceed with the below steps, stopping before Step 8 until the new switch has had a chance to upgrade.
  • Obtain Current Configuration.
  • Navigate to Switch Configure Switch templates within the parent template.
  • Click on the template in question.
  • Filter in the Search switches… field for the name of the old switch.
  • Note the local override configuration. Save in a text editor for use in Step 5.
  • In the child network, navigate to the Switch Monitor Switch ports page.
  • In the Search switches… field, filter by the name of the old switch and select the below column options.
  • Then, take screenshots of the port configurations or copy and paste into a spreadsheet or text editor application.
  • Configure replacement switch.
  • On the Switch Monitor Switch ports page of the child network, configure the switch ports of the new switch based on the configuration gathered in Step 4.
  • Once complete, navigate back to the switch template details page from Step 4 and ensure that the local overrides between the old and new switch match.
  • Power down the old switch.
  • Unbind Old Switch from template.
  • On the switch template details page, click the check box next to the old switch and then click the Unbind button.
  • Add the new switch to the stack.
  • After confirming that the new switch has upgraded its firmware as mentioned in Step 3, power down the new switch.
  • In the child network, navigate to the Switch Monitor Switch stacks page.
  • Click on the stack in question.
  • Click the Manage members tab.
  • Under Add members, click the checkbox next to the new switch and then click the Add switches button.
  • Remove the old switch from the stack.
  • In the child network, navigate to the Switch Monitor Switch stacks page.
  • Click on the stack in question.
  • Click the Manage members tab.
  • Click the checkbox next to the old switch and then click the Remove switches button.

Common Alerts

Ensure all stack members are configured on dashboard, online and connected via their stacking ports. If connected and configured correctly, the error will disappear within 20-30 minutes. If the error persists, please contact Cisco Meraki Technical Support for further troubleshooting.

This switch’s current stack members differ from the dashboard configuration.

This error can occur in the following scenarios:

  • Stack members are configured on dashboard, but not all members are connected via their stacking ports.
  • A stack member has failed or is powered off.

This switch is not connected to a stack.

This error can occur in the following scenarios:

This switch does not have a stack configuration.

This error can occur in the following scenarios:

  • The switch is physically connected as a stack, but not configured on dashboard as a stack member.

Recommended articles

  • configuring stack
  • how to stack
  • is_translated
  • ms-dash-help-docs
  • stack members
  • Stacking
  • stacking MS390
  • stacking 390
  • switch stack
  • switch stacking

MikroTik CRS125-24G-1S-2HnD-IN Twenty-four Gigabit Ethernet ports Cloud router switch. 2.4GHz wireless access point

Cloud Router Switch is our new Smart Switch series. It is a fully functional Layer 3 switch, and is powered by the familiar RouterOS. All the specific Switch configuration options are available in a special Switch menu, but if you want, ports can be removed from the switch configuration, and used for routing purposes.

Choose ports for Wire speed switching, or for routing purposes.

What’s more. this device has a built in 2.4GHz wireless access point, this means you can have an AP, a router with any number of ports, and a full wire speed Smart switch, all in one device. ideal for medium/small businesses and offices. It has 24 Gigabit ports, one SFP cage, a microUSB port and a built in Wireless AP.

Perfect SOHO gateway router, switch, 11n AP all in one box:

  • Ethernet, Fiber, or 4G (with optional USB modem) gateway connection to Internet
  • RouterOS gateway/firewall/VPN router with passive cooling
  • Up to twenty-five gigabit switch ports (1xSFP and 24xRJ45)
  • 1000mW high power 2.4GHz 11n wireless AP

Specifications:

Documentation:

Pricing Notes:

Syed Jahanzaib – Personal Blog to Share Knowledge !

Another Live Example of port monitoring with SMS/email/voice alert system in DUDE.

In my network, I have few Cisco switches at various departments connected via FIBER optics. Recently we were having issue of network connectivity in between various switches and devices. I already have a very good setup of Mikrotik base DUDE monitoring system, but it shows only the SWITCH availability status on the screen, I wanted to have a good visual for switch ports too.

I found few ways to accomplish this task using DUDE functions, scripts, etc, but found following method is very simple to start with. It also sends me email when any port goes Down or not in use.

mikrotik, stacking, switches, crs125-24g-1s-2hnd-in

Make sure your switch support SNMP. and SNMP agent is enabled at your SWITCH as well as at your DUDE to match the same. For simplicity you can use PUBLIC as a default community string in the switch. Also In this example I have used CISCO 3750 (in dual stack mode) and add only few ports just for example.

First add your switch in the map so that it can appear in the map as look like below.

mikrotik, stacking, switches, crs125-24g-1s-2hnd-in

As showed in the image below.

Adding PROBE for port monitoring

Now to add PORTS monitoring, Open Dude, Goto PROBES and click on sign to add new probe. Use the following data.

Name = PORT 9 Type = SNMP SNMP Profile = Your SNMP Profile Oid = iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.interfaces.ifTable.ifEntry.ifOperStatus.10109 Oid Type = integer Comapre method = equal Integer Value = 1

As showed in the image below.

Note: Change the OID number to match the port number on your switch. for example I am monitoring port number9 which value is 10109. You can use SNMPWALK via DUDE to check the OID’s for different ports of your switch.

Now click OK to save

Adding Switch PORT separately using IP and PROBE

Its time to add PORTs in your map so they can appear separately as showed in the title image

Go back to your MAP, Right click and ADD new device, Type your switch IP address, and click on Next, Now DO NOT click on Discover. simply click on sign In PROBE, Select the PORT 9 probe you created earlier and click on Apply/OK

As showed in the image below.

Now you will see something like below.

As you can see the port number 9 is down. so the status is shown correctly.

Now you can repeat the same procedure to add as much ports you like to monitor.

Something like below image.

Adding LINKS to monitor port usage

You can also add LINKS to show the port usage

As showed in the example below.

After adding ports / snmp links, and other enhancements. you can see something like below image

mikrotik, stacking, switches, crs125-24g-1s-2hnd-in

I will add more methods to monitor the ports. For more info. please read more at following links

Updated: 20th October 2015

Howto check Cisco 3750 Port Status via SNMP using BASH to format the output.

PORT1Q=`snmpwalk.Oqv.v1.c COMMUNITY_NAME IP_ADDRESS 1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.8.10101` if [ PORT1Q = 1 ]; then PORT1S=UP Echo PORT1S else PORT1S=DOWN Echo PORT1S fi

Комментарии и мнения владельцев »

Hi, i have mikoritk, and Ubiquity équipement on my network. I want to know if it’s possible to monitor all of this équipement with a same software. If not, what can i use for monitor my network. Thanks in advance. Like Like Comment by Alex Monkam — August 20, 2013 @ 1:17 PM

You can use DUDE to monitor all devices on your network, specially if they have SNMP support, monitoring can be enhanced with more data to show. Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — August 22, 2013 @ 4:21 PM

sir plz meri help karein mein internet cable ka kaam start karna chahata hun meine aik jaga linux per server bana hua dekha tha mein linux server configure karna seekhna chahata hun plz meri madad karein apka ahsan hoha meri koi help nahi kar raha hey app mujhe apna number dey dein agar aap chahein apki meherbani hogi mera naam farhan hey mera cell num hey 0321-2080078 kindly mujhe apna number SMS kardein plz plz plz. Like Like Comment by farhan — September 29, 2013 @ 6:39 PM

Assalam alaikum, can you please explain how to add Up time and Temperature for Switch or Router? Like Like Comment by M.Ahmed — September 2, 2013 @ 3:26 PM

Howto Show UPTIME Uptime: [string_substring(oid(“1.3.6.1.2.1.1.3.0”),0,8)] HOWTO show Cisco ASA 5510 Cpu Usage Cisco ASA Cpu Usage: CPU Load 1min: [oid(“1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.109.1.1.1.1.5.1”)] % HOWTO show Cisco 3750 Switch Temperature Temperature : [oid(“1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.3.1.3.1006”)] Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — September 3, 2013 @ 8:00 AM

I’m curious if you could leave a screen grab of your probe for the port up (green) / down (red) status? I cannot seem to get it to work following the examples here and in your MikroTik links. Thanks! Like Like Comment by Jon — June 4, 2014 @ 7:01 PM

Sorry cant do that, as I am busy with some project will update when I will get some free time at office. hang on Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — June 5, 2014 @ 12:05 PM

port monitor isn’t working with my scenario. i have Huawei s5700. i got the exact value but still its not working. and one more question how do i monitor optical transreciver via due. please help us to configure this two… Like Like Comment by mirza baig — July 6, 2016 @ 12:05 AM

you can monitor only those devices which are reachable via Layer 3, means IP. if your transceiver supports ip, it can be monitored via dude. Like Liked by 1 person Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — July 7, 2016 @ 3:12 PM

yes device is reachable through IP this is Huawei s5700. snmp is already configure in switch i have gather snmp related thing via mikrotik dude, the only thing that i want to monitor is 10gig sfp transreciever or port up down alert throufh dude via mail Like Like Comment by mirza baig — July 13, 2016 @ 10:25 PM

[…] via Monitor Switch Ports Up/Down Status via Mikrotik Dude – Short Notes — Syed Jahanzaib Personal Bl… […] Like Like Pingback by Monitor Switch Ports Up/Down Status via Mikrotik Dude – Short Notes — Syed Jahanzaib Personal Blog to Share Knowledge ! – Ever Smile IT — November 3, 2016 @ 12:27 AM