Infinity screen Samsung TV. Samsung 2021 TV lineup: everything you need to know

infinity, screen, samsung, 2021

Samsung 2021 TV lineup: everything you need to know

This is looking like a big year for Samsung TVs. Having somewhat trodden water in 2020, the company appears to be striding forward in 2021, with highlights that include consumer MicroLED models, ‘Neo QLEDs’ with astonishingly small Mini LEDs, and a new version of the One Connect box that can be attached to the TV’s pedestal stand.

Each of these overriding themes of Samsung in 2021 is outlined just below this section, and below that we’ve outlined the entire model lineup with all of the latest information available. Fair warning, though; Samsung is notorious for its confusing model numbers and lineups, particularly between regions, and this year is worse than ever. You’ll see what we mean when you get there.

Before we get into the nitty-gritty, though, a quick overview of 2021 model designations: 2021 is year ‘A’ for Samsung, whereas 2020 was year ‘T’ (as in ‘Q70T’) and 2019 was ‘R’ (as in Q70R). You can therefore expect QLED model numbers to end in an ‘A’ (Q70A, for example), and LCD models to have one before their series designation (e.g. ‘AU8000’).

Finally, you’ll also see an ‘N’ in some QLED model numbers – ‘QN85A’, for example. This denotes the Neo QLED (i.e. Mini LED) models from those that utilise standard LED backlights.

Samsung MicroLED TV

While Samsung has been talking about MicroLED for quite some time now, 2021 has finally seen the launch of consumer models.

For the unfamiliar, MicroLED is a next-gen TV technology that essentially takes the best qualities of OLED and removes more or less all of its shortcomings. Like OLED, each pixel is self-emissive, so one can be completely black while those next to it can be bright white or a vibrant colour, creating incredible contrast.

MicroLEDs can actually go much brighter than OLEDs, though, theoretically resulting in even more spectacular contrast. Samsung is quoting a peak brightness rating of 2000 nits in regard to this new MicroLED TV, which makes it around twice as bright as even the best OLEDs. What’s more, unlike OLED TVs, which use organic materials (‘OLED’ stands for ‘Organic Light Emitting Diode’), MicroLEDs are inorganic, so don’t degrade and can’t suffer from image retention or burn-in.

The new consumer MicroLED TV will be available in four sizes: 76 inches, 88 inches, 99 inches and a huge 110 inches. Each model comes pre-assembled as a complete flatscreen TV, unlike commercial MicroLEDs, which come as smaller modules that can be assembled in various configurations.

Interestingly, given the huge sizes and next-gen credentials we’re talking about, this new consumer MicroLED TV boasts ‘only’ a 4K resolution. That’s because the size of the individual MicroLEDs (each of which represents a single pixel, remember) means there are physical limitations to pixel density (how many pixels can be crammed into each inch of screen). In other words, MicroLEDs will have to get even smaller before MicroLED TVs become available at smaller sizes and higher resolutions.

Of course, what you really want to know is how much Samsung’s new consumer MicroLED costs. Unfortunately, while Harrods in London now has a display model and is taking orders for the 110-inch MNA110MS1, it’s so far not been at all forthcoming on the price. That said, Business Korea claims that it’s expected to be priced over 100-million won, which translates to roughly £70,000 (90,000, AU125,000).

Neo QLEDs with Mini LED backlighting

While MicroLED remains the preserve of the super-rich for now, Samsung is bringing Mini LED tech to its premium QLEDs, which it refers to as ‘Neo QLEDs’.

Samsung explains that the majority of a typical LED’s size is made up of its protective packaging and light-guiding lens, both of which it’s done away with for its so-called ‘New LEDs’. Not only that, it’s also miniaturised the LEDs themselves, to quite astonishing effect.

As part of a video presentation, Samsung demonstrated to us the degree of difference by putting a petri dish containing 100 traditional backlight LEDs next to another containing its New LEDs. The traditional LEDs are big and clear, filling their dish, while the New LEDs genuinely look like nothing more than sparkly grains of sand. Samsung says the New LEDs are a fortieth the size of traditional LEDs, but even that doesn’t convey how incredibly tiny they appear.

Instead of a lens, Samsung’s New LED backlights use a new ‘micro layer’ that guides the light through the quantum dots (which provide the set’s colours). The result is apparently no light leakage or blooming, and because the New LEDs are so much smaller, significantly more of them can be packed in – one slide we saw referred to ten-times greater density. Given that Samsung’s top 2020 model, the Q950TS, is said to have around 500 dimming zones (Samsung doesn’t publish specific numbers), we’re potentially talking about around 5000 zones for these top Neo QLEDs. The number of dimming zones will vary by model, though.

Of course, Samsung isn’t the first TV brand to utilise Mini LEDs, but the company claims that its are the smallest and most precise out there – mind you, that was before LG announced its own Mini LED TVs.

Neo Quantum Processor

Of no surprise at all is that Samsung is introducing a new processor for its 2021 TVs. This ‘Neo Quantum Processor’ brings with it, among other things, more precise dimming and a local power distribution feature that sends power to the brightest areas of the picture and away from the darker parts. It also works in conjunction with a sensor integrated into the TV’s frame to adjust brightness and contrast in response to ambient lighting conditions.

In Samsung’s 2021 8K TVs, the Neo Quantum Processor also utilises something that Samsung calls ‘Multi-Intelligence Deep Learning’ to improve upscaling. The company explains that in 2020 its deep learning produced a single neural network, but in 2021 the system can produce up to 16 neural networks that enhance resolution and overall video quality. Essentially, it seems that each of the neural networks specialises in a different area of picture quality, then a Neural Analyser selects the most appropriate for the specific content being played.

Extension of Object-Tracking Sound (OTS)

Samsung introduced Object-Tracking Sound with last year’s QLEDs, but this year it’s been expanded, both in terms of the models it covers and the number of speakers involved.

There are now four versions of OTS, with the new OTS Lite at the bottom and OTS Pro at the top. Each version differs in terms of the number of speakers involved.

OTS Lite consists of two physical speakers at the bottom and two ‘virtual speakers’ that provide height. It’s available on the most premium LCD models. The standard version of OTS adds physical speakers to the top of the set, OTS adds side-firing speakers, and OTS Pro adds extra tweeters, taking the complete speaker array up to a total of 6.2.2 channels.

Every version of OTS is designed to fill a room as much as possible and provide three-dimensional tracking of effects, very much along the lines of virtualised Dolby Atmos. Some models also feature something called ‘SpaceFit’, which is an enhanced version of the company’s existing Adaptive Sound tech that adapts audio performance to the TV’s surroundings.

All models also appear to feature Active Voice Amplifier, which is designed to actively detect external noise and boost the volume of the voice track so that dialogue is more audible, and Q Symphony, which allows the TV’s speakers to work in conjunction with a connected Samsung soundbar – there’s a whole new range of those in 2021, of course, including the recently reviewed HW-Q800A.

Design, new One Connect and solar remote control

Like many of us humans, Samsung’s TVs appear to be on a slimness drive in 2021. The top 8K models were already just 15mm thick, so it’s little surprise that they’re not getting any slimmer, but all of the 4K models specifically mentioned so far have a thickness of 2.5cm. That represents a 1cm reduction in thickness for the top QN90A (compared with the Q90T), and a slimming-down of over 3cm for lower models such as the Q70A and Q60A QLEDs, and the AU9000 LCD.

If your s are deep enough for the flagship QN900A 8K model, you’ll also get Samsung’s Infinity Screen, which is an essentially bezel-less, edge-to-edge display, as seen with 2020’s Q950TS.

We were worried about the future of Samsung’s One Connect system, which sees all connections (and even power) routed through an external processing box that can be placed out of sight, but Samsung has in fact launched a new version of One Connect for 2021. The big news is that the new One Connect box is significantly smaller and slimmer than the one it replaces, to the extent that it can be attached to the rear of the stand if required.

Those who are wall-mounting (or who simply want to move cable-clutter as far away from the display as possible) can still place the new unit on a separate shelf or in a cupboard, and its new shape and size should make it far easier to find a home for.

The 2021 One Connect is available on the QN95A 4K set and all 8K models.

Samsung has also developed a light-powered remote control for 2021. It looks very similar to the excellent One Remote of existing models, but there’s a solar panel on the rear that enables it to be charged in the ambient light of an average living room. This ‘Eco Remote Control’ works really well and comes with all QLED models.

Gaming features

Samsung’s long been at the forefront of gaming TV tech, and that remains the case in 2021. 4K@120Hz is supported on all models from the Q70A and up, VRR support includes Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync Premium Pro, ALLM and HGiG are both supported, and input lag is down to just 9.8ms.

Interestingly, Samsung is also promising support for 4K@120Hz on its AU8000 and AU9000 LCD models, even though they feature 60Hz panels. The company’s calling this technology ‘Motion Xcelerator Turbo’, but it’s not yet clear how it works beyond Samsung saying that it allows the models to refresh twice as fast. These models are getting AMD FreeSync certification, too – that’s apparently a first for a 60Hz TV.

On top of all of that, Samsung is introducing something it’s calling ‘Super Ultrawide Gameview’, which allows you to force the TV into ultra-wide aspect ratios, essentially simulating the experience of using an ultra-wide gaming monitor. This obviously involves big black bars filling in the screen’s unused display area, so we’re not sure how appealing it will really be, but time will tell.

One slight disappointment is that while next-gen HDMI 2.1 is supported by a lot of TVs in the 2021 range, most only get one such socket, with the others being lower-bandwidth HDMI 2.0s. To get a full complement of four HDMI 2.1 connections, you’ll need to opt for one of the models that has the One Connect box. It only currently makes a difference for 4K@120Hz signals and therefore to those lucky enough to have both the PS5 and Xbox Series X (and/or a high-end gaming PC), but it’s an undeniable minus point when compared to most LG OLEDs, which have had four HDMI 2.1 sockets since 2019.

Smart features

The Tizen Smart platform itself has changed very little, but that’s no bad thing – it was already the best in the business in terms of its app offering and usability.

That said, Samsung has seen its way to offer some pandemic-friendly features such as Google Duo for video calls and a Smart Trainer app, the latter of which is an extension of the existing Samsung Health platform. Taking full advantage of either involves buying an optional video camera, which can track you around the room in the vein of Portal.

Samsung is also extending its Multi-View feature, which allows you to display multiple sources at once in a split-screen format. It’s going to be available on all models from the AU9000 upwards, with 4K models supporting two Windows and 8K models supporting four. In our QN95A review we noted disappointing limitations to this feature, though – of the two Windows, one has to be an external source and the other has to be an app, but currently only two apps (YouTube and wellness app called Calm) are supported, severely hampering its usefulness. Here’s hoping more apps are made compatible in the near future.

Samsung 2021 TV range breakdown

So that’s the overview of the technology behind Samsung’s 2021 TV range, but what about specific models? We now have a pretty complete picture of the range in both the UK (and Europe) and US, and you’ll find all the details below.

To reiterate something we said right near the top of this page – there are some very confusing discrepancies between the models available in different regions. Not only are some models exclusive to certain countries, which isn’t a terribly new thing, some models (most notably the QN90A) have different specs depending on where you buy them. We’ve attempted to explain all of that below, but it’s fair to say that Samsung hasn’t been completely forthcoming with this information so there could still be differences that we’re not yet aware of.

Samsung QN900A 8K Neo QLED TV

Samsung’s very top QLED model for 2021 is the QN900A. This is, of course, an 8K model, and it features the new LED backlight.

Design-wise, it boasts the edge-to-edge Infinity Screen and a super-low profile 4mm pedestal stand, to which the new One Connect box can be attached. It’s just 15mm thick, and the three-degree lean of the outgoing Q950TS has gone – this model stands straight up.

The QN900A is available to buy now in UK, US and Australia.

Samsung QN900A specs:

Samsung QN900A prices:

  • QE65QN900A / QN65QN900A / QA65QN900A – £5999 / 5000 / AU6799
  • QE75QN900A / QN75QN900A / QA75QN900A – £7999 / 7000 / AU9499
  • QE85QN900A / QN85QN900A / QA85QN900A – £11999 / 9000 / AU12,499

Samsung’s 8K TV gave me a glimpse of the future.- and a big reason to look away

Review: The Samsung QN800B TV displays some of the most beautiful pictures I’ve ever seen on a TV screen. It’s also very expensive.

Rebecca Isaacs is a tech writer based in New York City. Her passion for tech has provided expert insight for many publications including NBC and Digital Trends.

Rebecca Isaacs is a tech writer based in New York City. Her passion for tech has provided expert insight for many publications including NBC and Digital Trends.

The 65-inch Samsung QN800B QLED 8K TV (2022)

pros and cons

  • Vivid detailed picture
  • Neural Quantum Processor upscales content to 8K
  • Automatic brightness adjustment for dim and bright environments
  • Very expensive at 2,799
  • Some console connectivity issues
  • Computer hub separate from TV

The QN800B TV is for those that want the very best in their living rooms or want a future-proof television system.

When you get the opportunity to test out Samsung’s 65-inch QN800B 8K QLED TV, you do not hesitate to check out an 8K picture. Such was the case about a month ago when I was offered this opportunity, and with Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power days away from release, it was the perfect time to see its picture quality.

After testing it out for a few weeks, I’ve found this TV is not only one of the best TVs I’ve ever tested, but it’s also indicative of the future of televisions, and the future is looking vivid, bright, and beautiful.

Specs

100% Color Volume with Quantum Dot

Neural Quantum Processor 8K

Design

The QN800B is heavy which may come as a surprise if you’re used to lighter-weight flat screens. It weighs nearly 69 pounds with the stand. But the weight doesn’t solely rest on the TV; behind it sits the Smart Tizen Slim One Connect hub that houses the new Neural Quantum 8K processor. It took some delicate finagling to get this hub to rest in the groove on the stand and locked in with the included lid, but once that’s done, it’s essentially a set it and forget it component. You can also mount the hub or leave it on the side, but for a TV this immersive, you’ll want to tuck away any and all distractions.

Speaking of immersive, the QN800B features an infinity screen design, so the bezel is close to non-existent. The TV is 0.7-inches thick and plastered with plenty of ventilation holes to keep the heat that the TV generates evenly dispersed. From watching movies to bingeing TV shows, the Samsung TV certainly gets warm while on, but not hot enough to damage wall plaster should you mount it. That’s quite a feat for an 8K-running machine.

Picture quality

The 8K provides a detailed depth to the picture that I didn’t realize I lacked in my old model. When watching The Rings of Power, it highlighted each gold leaflet on the elven crowns, and I could see every tree bark groove in the forested Eregion scenes. For major shows I watched like House of the Dragon and The Rings of Power, Samsung’s Quantum Dot Technology, with its 33 million pixels and Mini LEDs, came to play. From drastically improving the level of detail in pictures to making scenes all the more color-accurate, these future-forward aspects are a rarity with mainstream TVs and a big reason why the QN800B costs as much as it does.

In addition to the detailed imagery on-screen, the TV features a Smart Adaptive Picture mode that enhanced my viewing both in the brightest and darkest ambient conditions. For new content like House of the Dragon and The Rings of Power, the TV kept my picture beautiful, bright, and viewable at any time of day. But it also created minor issues in older film footage. I watched the original Lord of the Rings trilogy in order to see how effective the new processor’s 8K upscaling was and some scenes in Fangorn Forest appeared a little too blue, dulling out other colors.

Gaming was much better. My partner is a PlayStation 4 gamer and I watched him play Guardians of the Galaxy for this review. Because of the 8K picture and the 120Hz refresh rate, the gameplay felt incredibly detailed. During one galactic battle in an asteroid field, I could see not only the detailing on the ship, including scratches from old dog fights, but also each asteroid’s unique shape. For gamers, having this high detail in their picture not only provides a more immersive entertainment experience but allows them to appreciate the creator’s artistry.

Performance

One of my biggest problems with the QN800B didn’t stem from the picture quality but from the other performance factors of the TV. While the TV comes with a built-in Smart Tizen hub that houses all the apps I typically use, I opted to retain my handy Roku Ultra as it’s connected to my Philips Hue hub. As the TV screen adjusts color and brightness, my Smart bulbs complement what I’m watching.- but I couldn’t get this feature working with the QN800B. This seems to be a Roku thing, but the incompatibility certainly took away from the viewing experience. Additionally, I found the TV refusing to register the PlayStation 4 and the Roku as different HDMI ports, and couldn’t troubleshoot that correctly.

Greatness never ends: The First Look 2021 | Samsung

This glitch however didn’t impede any other performances on the TV. The Neural Quantum Processor 8K highlighted the Real Depth Enhancer, giving images a more 3D-like experience on-screen, so I felt more immersed in the content I watched. Coupled with Smart Calibration, a feature that helped calibrate my TV for my apartment’s bright living room, Dolby Atmos, and Object Tracking Sound, the QN800B felt like one of the complete TVs I’ve tested. The viewing experience with these integrated technologies was nothing I had seen before, and I expect similar features to come with future market models.

Pricing

By now, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the QN800B costs a lot of money. It starts at 2,799 and my tested model clocks in at 3,499. It’s a high price to pay for a TV, no question. However, the power and immersive viewing experience for the price makes it a semi-justifiable investment, especially considering Sony its Sony 75-inch class Bravia XR Z9J LED 8K UHD model at 3,999 and it can only perform up to 4K upscaling. In comparison, the Samsung QN800B automatically upscales its content to 8K. As someone who has reviewed multiple TVs, you can see the difference on-screen.

Bottom line

Samsung’s QN800B QLED 8K TV is as good as it gets, but it’s the lofty price tag that holds me back from fully committing to one. Still, I recommend the QN800B TV for those that want the very best in their living rooms or want a future-proof television system.- and money is not an object.

Additionally, this TV was designed for those that want to see every detail during viewing, and those that want a model that will very likely support the formats and resolutions that shows and movies come in for the foreseeable future. If you’re in the market for a top-of-the-line model or are a huge movie and show enthusiast who enjoys watching for the little details, this model will be the best for your living room.

Alternatives to Consider

This is a lot of cash to invest in a TV. If you’re looking for alternatives to the Samsung QN800B TV, take a look below for some alternatives to consider for your home.

Samsung TV 2023: The latest on the 4K and 8K Neo QLED, QLED and Crystal UHD TVs

We’ve rounded up all the details on their brand new 8K models as well as new entries in their 4K Neo QLED, OLED and Micro LED TV ranges.

You’ll also find on this page models, sizes and features for the TVs that Samsung launched in 2021 and 2022 that are still available, as well as collated all the latest too. If you’re shopping Samsung for your TV, this is the first (and hopefully last) stop to help you find what you’re looking for.

New Samsung TVs for 2023

Samsung is a big believer in offering a wide portfolio of TVs for any customer, and the 2023 range offers their most bumper range of options yet.

The onus for its 2023 TVs appears to be on “enhanced connectivity and personalized consumer experiences” in the aim to simplify consumers everyday lives with “multi-device integration” through Samsung’s Smart platform SmartThings.

Expect a big push in terms of home interconnectivity and Samsung TVs being at the centre of the Smart experience with Matter and HCA support coming in 2023.

New 8K and 4K models

A new feature is the algorithm that’s powering Samsung’s new Auto HDR Remastering. It makes use of AI deep learning technology to “analyse and apply real-time HDR effects on SDR content on a scene-by-scene basis”, transforming SDR content to create a brighter, more immersive performance.

Massive TV screen sizes

Bigger is apparently better when it comes to Samsung’s TV screen sizes as it has launched the Q80C model in a whopping 98-inch screen size.

You get the same features as you would on the smaller screens with picture driven by the 4K Neural Quantum Processor and its AI Upscaling needing to flex its muscles even with a 98-inch screen. And with such a big screen, if you suffer from eye strain then the EyeComfort Mode automatically adjusts the brightness, and when the TV is watched during the evenings it’ll be able to reduce the amount of blue light emitted to give images a warmer look that’s more comfortable for your eyes.

The 98-inch Q80C is not the only super-sized screen launched by Samsung this summer. The S90C OLED has been expanded to accommodate an 83-inch in the US (no word yet on a UK release). The OLED panel for this screen is supplied by LG Display, so it is technically not the same type of performance as you’d get from the 55-, 65, and 77-inch QD-OLED models. Something to bear in mind in case you’re thinking of buying an 83-inch S90C.

Expanding Micro LED and QD-OLED models

Samsung is beefing up their QD-OLED line-up with a new 77-inch model that’s been rumoured for the last several months. The 77-inch model is said to be able to hit 2000 nits of brightness in the right conditions, though expect that to be less so with everyday viewing (above 1000 nits).

The QD-OLED line-up features the less expensive S90C series and premium S95C (both of which have a 77-inch option). Other features mentioned include 144Hz refresh rate, along with certification for AMD’s FreeSync Premium Pro for smoother, swifter PC gaming.

The Micro LED series stretches from 50- to 140-inches, though this screen is not bound by size or shape as it is modular, so it can be made as big or as small as your set-up requires. No mention of price for either the Micro LED or QD-OLED TVs, but we’ll find out closer to launch.

infinity, screen, samsung, 2021

Upgraded Gaming Hub

As part of its refreshed Tizen interface, Samsung introduced its Gaming Hub and it is taking the idea a few steps further with a few upgrades planned for 2023.

Those upgrades include MiniMap Sharing that enables players to see a mini map of what they’re playing at-a-glance, while the Virtual Aim Point is designed for first-person shooters to give players a more obvious crosshair for the ‘perfect shot’. Sounds like cheating to us…

Have the Royal dogs watching over you

If you love dogs then you’ll be wagging your tongue furiously as Samsung has licensed pet artworks from Royal Collection Trust – a charity that oversees the Royal Collection and one of the world’s largest private art gatherings – and in doing so has brought the Royal Dogs Collection to the Samsung Art Store.

That’s right, you can have Corgis looking over you while you’re not using the TV. A subscription is needed to access the artwork, but if you purchase The Frame TV, you’re eligible for a two-month free trial.

Samsung TV 2023

QN900C

  • QE65QN900CTXXU – check price
  • QE75QN900CTXXU – check price
  • QE85QN900CTXXU – check price

Sitting at the top of Samsung’s TV tree is the QN900C. This 8K model is the pinnacle of the Korean giant’s offering for 2023. It features what Samsung is claiming to be its most intelligent, AI-powered processor to help the TV upscale less-than 8K images to 8K resolution, as well as amplifying contrast and reducing background noise.

Dolby Atmos audio is supported through its twelve built-in speakers, there’s HDR10 compatibility along with HDR10 and HLG for video, and for PC gamers it supports refresh rates up to 144Hz.

Having reviewed the QN900C we were mightily impressed by its outstandingly bright and colourful picture quality and fantastic upscaling. It’s expensive, but it does make 4K content look even better than most 4K TVs are capable of.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 8K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology Pro
  • Ultra Wide Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS Pro/Dolby Atmos
  • 90W 6.2.4 channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • One Connect (attachable)
  • Up to 144Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Infinity One Design/Infinity Screen
  • Multi View (4 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo Pro

QN800C

  • QE65QN800CTXXU – check price
  • QE75QN800CTXXU – check price
  • QE85QN800CTXXU – check price

The step-down 8K model from the QN900C. The most obvious difference is the drop in price, with the QN800C around £1000 less than its sibling. It doesn’t have the Infinity Screen design of the flagship model, which essentially translates to seeing the bezels that frame the screen and that it has a slightly thicker depth.

The screen doesn’t support refresh rates up to 144Hz (instead a mere 100Hz); and the audio system isn’t as advanced with its 70W OTS 4.2.2 channel configuration.

Otherwise, you’re looking at a similar level of performance in other areas with 4K/120Hz gameplay supported and HDMI 2.1 covered across all its inputs via the One Connect box. Look out for our review of the QN800C soon.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 8K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology Pro
  • Ultra Wide Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 70W 4.2.2 channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • One Connect (attachable)
  • Up to 100Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Infinity One Design
  • Multi View (4 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

QN700C

  • QE55QN700CTXXU – check price
  • QE65QN700CTXXU – check price
  • QE75QN700CTXXU – check price

The last in Samsung’s 8K TV series is the QN700C, and much like the QN800C, the specs and features taper off for this entry-level screen.

The QN700C doesn’t come in the same sizes, offering a 55-inch model to go with the 65- and 75-inch versions. The panel’s refresh rate is 50Hz, half that of the QN800C, and there’s not the level of performance to be found in its picture quality. There’s no HDR10 Gaming support, contrast isn’t as effective as the QN800C and the processor is the ‘Lite’ version of Samsung’s Quantum Neural Processor 8K. Viewing angles aren’t as wide with the QN700C’s Wide Viewing Angle tech.

The built-in audio system isn’t as strong with 60W of power for the 4.2-channel system, and the QN700C uses the OTS Lite version, which means it utilises physical and virtual speakers to track sound across the screen.

  • Neural Quantum Processor Lite 8K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology
  • Wide Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 60W 4.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • One Connect (attachable)
  • Up to 50Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Infinity One Design
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

QN95C

  • QE55QN95CATXXU – check price
  • QE65QN95CATXXU – check price
  • QE75QN95CATXXU – check price
  • QE85QN95CATXXU – check price

The QN95C is the flagship 4K Neo QLED for 2023. Samsung has brought several significant upgrades over the the QN95B, which include doubling the number of dimming zones, offering even better black levels, contrast and colour performance.

The audio performance is a step-up too, with more power, clarity and scale to its performance compared to its predecessor. HDMI 2.1 is supported across all the HDMI inputs through the One Connect box, and all the usual gaming features are supported in ALLM, variable refresh rates (up to 144Hz) and the Super Ultra Wide Game View for PC users.

We called the QN95C “nothing short of spectacular” in our review. If you aren’t interested in 8K and want class-leading levels of brightness and contrast (for an LCD TV), Samsung’s latest model is a terrific showcase of the tech.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology
  • Ultra Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 70W 4.2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • One Connect (attachable)
  • Up to 144Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Infinity One Design
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

QN93C

  • QE43QN93CATXXU – check price
  • QE50QN93CATXXU – check price
  • QE55QN93CATXXU – check price
  • QE65QN93CATXXU – check price
  • QE75QN93CATXXU – check price
  • QE85QN93CATXXU – check price

What’s the QN93C? Compared to the QN95C, it has a few changes in terms of its spec. The screen supports refresh rates up to 120Hz (and not 144Hz as the QN95C does); the configuration of the audio system is the same but there’s less power (60W compared to 70W).

The HDMI 2.1 standard is supported across all inputs, so you could plug multiple HDMI 2.1 devices into its port and not be restricted. Other changes include the QN93C being available in smaller 43- and 50-inch sizes. The stand is also slightly different in that it has a smaller footprint but that’s unlikely to impact on where it’s placed on a TV rack.

This model isn’t as widely available as the QN95C, with Samsung and Selfridges stocking this particular model.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology
  • Ultra Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 60W 4.2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 120Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

QN90C

  • QE43QN90CATXXU – check price
  • QE50QN90CATXXU – check price
  • QE55QN90CATXXU – check price
  • QE65QN90CATXXU – check price
  • QE75QN90CATXXU – check price
  • QE85QN90CATXXU – check price

The QN90C is the ‘proper’ step-down model though any difference between it and the QN93C are negligible. It has the same panel refresh rate, same built-in audio system, same HDMI 2.1 support, same design (aside from the stand being in black), and same number of sizes.

They appear to be the exact same TV but the QN93C appears to be a retailer exclusive to Selfridges Co.

Read our review of the Samsung QN90C

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology
  • Ultra Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 60W 4.2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 120Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

QN88C

  • QE55QN88CATXXU – check price
  • QE65QN88CATXXU – check price
  • QE75QN88CATXXU – check price

If the logic of the QN90C/QN93C applies here, the QN88C should be have parity in terms of features and spec with the QN85C. Indeed this model is another that looks to be a retailer exclusive to Selfridges Co.

The difference is cosmetic with a black stand instead of the a silver one. The QN88C also comes in fewer sizes.

QN85C

  • QE655QN85CATXXU – check price
  • QE65QN85CATXXU – check price
  • QE75QN85CATXXU – check price
  • QE85QN85CATXXU – check price

Opt for the QN85C over the QN88C and you get a choice of more sizes with an 85-inch model available. That really appears to be it in terms of readily obvious differences.

The QN85C is the entry-level Neo QLED, but its features compares fairly well to the QN90C above it. The panel supports refresh rates up to 120Hz, all for HDMI inputs are HDMI 2.1 compatible (great if you have PS5, Xbox and PC gaming options).

Viewing angles aren’t as wide, the audio system isn’t as advanced, and there are a few missing features such as the Expert Calibration/Advanced Calibration. The HDR performance is mighty as the QN90C either.

That said, we were still impressed by the QN85C, with an image quality that impresses without sacrificing too much to reach its entry-level status.

Read our review of the Samsung QN85C

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Quantum Matrix Technology
  • Wide Viewing Angle
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 60W 2.2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 120Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

S95C

  • QE55S95CATXXU – check price
  • QE65S95CATXXU – check price
  • QE77S95CATXXU – check price

After years of niggles and complaints about OLED, Samsung decided to jump onboard and beat LG at its own game with its QD-OLED technology. And the S95C is one of the best OLEDs on the market.

It improves upon last year’s S95B, fulfilling more of QD-OLED’s potential. It hits a higher peak brightness with HDR content (nearly 1400 nits), and combined with deep blacks to leads to excellent levels of contrast. The colours its produces are both vibrant and subtle, and the upscaling of content that’s less than 4K is excellent.

The S95C is the only one of Samsung’s OLEDs that supports the One Connect box that attaches to the rear of the stand. Refresh rates up to 144Hz are supported on this set (and all HDMI inputs support the 2.1 standard), you get Ultra Wide Viewing Angles and the audio system is of similar power to the Neo QLEDs with 70W divided between 4.2.2-channel configuration. This is one of the leading contenders for 2023’s best TV.

Read our review of the Samsung S95C OLED

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Ultra Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS/Dolby Atmos
  • 70W 4.2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • One Connect (attachable)
  • Up to 144Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Infinity One Design
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo Pro

S92C

You would think that Samsung has launched three OLEDs for 2023, but in the S92C it does appear that we’re looking at a variant of the S90C given that they are virtually identical.

There’s no difference in features, design or even price. All we can surmise is that the S92C is stocked at a few retailers that the S90C isn’t, such as Argos and AO.com.

S90C

  • QE55S90CATXXU – check price
  • QE65S90CATXXU – check price
  • QE77S90CATXXU – check price

If we had to nail our colours to the mast, we’d say that the S90C isn’t a ‘new’ TV but the 2022 S95B repackaged in a slightly different form.

Expect performance to be on a similar path as the S95B. Peak HDR performance is around 1000 nits (depending on the picture mode), the audio system is the less powerful OTS Lite with only 40W of power. However, in keeping with the rest of Samsung’s premium TVs, all HDMI inputs support the 2.1 standard.

The main difference between the S90C and the S92C is that the former comes in a bigger 77-inch. Specs for that model are the same as the other sizes. Look out for our review of the S90C in the coming weeks.

In the US there is an 83-inch version of the S90C available, although this doesn’t not use the same panel as the other sizes. The 83-inch uses an OLED panel supplied from LG Display, which is not the same as the QD-OLED panels made by Samsung Display used in the other sizes.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Ultra Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflective screen
  • OTS Lite/Dolby Atmos
  • 40W 2.1-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 144Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo Pro

Q80C

  • QE50Q80CATXXU
  • QE55Q80CATXXU
  • QE65Q80CATXXU
  • QE75Q80CATXXU
  • QE85Q80CATXXU

Now we reach the QLED range of Samsung’s TVs. The most obvious fall off in performance is in picture terms, with the Q80C downgraded to a Full Array backlight from the QN85C’s Mini LED panel. It’ll likely be able to reach a similar level of brightness with HDR content, but not with the same level of precision. Black levels and contrast will be affected.

Despite having the same picture processor, a few of the AI-assisted features have been chalked off (AI HDR Remastering), and the audio system is less powerful too, switching to OTS Lite and a 40W, 2.2-channel system. The 85-inch model only supports a native refresh rate of 50Hz. There’s no Anti-Reflection on this screen.

4K/120Hz is supported across all across all its HDMI 2.1 inputs (which is impressive), and gaming features look to be similar if not an exact match. The stand is bigger, so perhaps consider planting the Q80C on wider pieces of AV furniture, and you get a smaller 50-inch size too.

  • Neural Quantum Processor 4K
  • Wide Viewing Angle
  • OTS Lite/Dolby Atmos
  • 40W 2.2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 100Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

Q75C

You may have guessed that there’s a ‘5’ in the model name, which indicates this is a variant! And again, like the rest of the variants listed in this range guide, it’s available in fewer sizes (55- to 75-inches). Differences appear to be merely cosmetic with a different stand that elevates the TV slightly higher than the pedestal on the Q70C does.

Q70C

This model drops the Full Array backlight for Samsung’s Dual LED solution, which indicates that this is a Edge-lit screen. Contrast, local dimming, peak brightness and black levels will take a hit compared to the Q80C. This and the Q75C are the first sets to drop the Neural processor, which seems to indicate less A.I. assistance.

This set isn’t compatible with Dolby Atmos, and the integrated sound system isn’t as powerful with just 20W afforded to its speakers. This is a model we’d suggest budgeting a soundbar for as a result. sizes are covered but only if you have the space for the 85-inch screen.

Impressively there’s HDMI 2.1 support across all its inputs, which is not something we see around this price point, and appears to be a feature that Samsung has placed a big emphasis on for this year. Expect the gaming performance to be around the same level as the models above.

  • Quantum Processor 4K
  • Wide Viewing Angle
  • OTS Lite
  • 20W 2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 100Hz refresh rate
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo
  • QE43Q65CAUXXU – check price
  • QE50Q65CAUXXU – check price
  • QE55Q65CAUXXU – check price
  • QE65Q65CAUXXU – check price
  • QE75Q65CAUXXU – check price

Q65C

We work our down to the Q65C, which if you’ve made it this far down the list, is another variant; this time of the Q60C. It’s like we’re in the Marvel Cinematic Universe with Samsung’s TVs.

The difference between the two is that the Q65C comes in fewer sizes, otherwise you’re looking at the same TV. This doesn’t appear to be a retailer exclusive like some of the variants above, but it’s not widely available either Currently only Amazon UK along with John Lewis Partners have this TV in stock. The latter might be preferable, giving John Lewis offers five-year guarantees.

Q60C

  • QE43Q60CAUXXU
  • QE50Q60CAUXXU
  • QE55Q60CAUXXU
  • QE65Q60CAUXXU
  • QE75Q60CAUXXU
  • QE85Q60CAUXXU

Identical to the Q65C in appearance, the Q60C gains a bigger size with its 85-inch screen. All screens sizes come with a refresh rate of 50Hz.

The better comparison is against the Q70C and in that regard the Q60C sheds a lot of features. The 50Hz refresh rate is down from the Q70C’s 100Hz, we also drop down to the Quantum Processor Lite 4K for picture, so expect contrast to take a hit.

There’s no Atmos but the sound system is effectively the same. The biggest drop is in gaming and connectivity terms. No 4K/120Hz or HDMI 2.1 support whatsoever. Variable refresh rates also appear to have the way of the Dodo with no FreeSync or HDMI VRR included. It does retain the Super UltraWide Gaming View for PC users, but those with PS5 and Xbox Series consoles may want to look elsewhere for a TV that can double up as a gaming monitor.

  • Quantum Processor Lite 4K
  • Dual LED
  • Wide Viewing Angle
  • OTS Lite
  • 20W 2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HDR10 Adaptive, HLG
  • Up to 50Hz refresh rate
  • ALLM, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • Motion Xcelerator

CU8510

While the CU8510 sits on top of this list, it is – you guessed it – a variant of the CU8500. The main difference is a cosmetic one, the CU8510 has a white stand and the CU8500 has a compact black stand. This model is also available in fewer sizes, and as far as we can tell is only to purchase directly from Samsung or from Selfridges.

CU8500

  • UE43CU8500KXXU
  • UE50CU8500KXXU
  • UE55CU8500KXXU
  • UE65CU8500KXXU
  • UE75CU8500KXXU

We believe the CU8500 to be the flagship entry in its Crystal UHD line-up for 2023. The difference between it and the Q60C QLED is not a gulf but their certainly is a drop off in features.

The processor used is the less power Crystal Processor, and it doesn’t support the HDR10 Adaptive format that adapts the brightness of the screen in bright and dark room environments. There’s no Dual LED screen tech so expect contrast to be weaker on this TV.

The audio performance is similar with no Dolby Atmos and a 20W audio system. Finally, gaming features are of the basic variety with only auto low latency mode and HGiG HDR among the supported features. All that marks this TV out as one for more casual users in need of an affordable TV.

  • Crystal Processor 4K
  • OTS Lite
  • 20W 2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • Up to 50Hz refresh rate
  • ALLM, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Q-Symphony
  • Motion Xcelerator

CU8070

  • UE43CU8070UXXU
  • UE50CU8070UXXU
  • UE55CU8070UXXU
  • UE65CU8070UXXU
  • UE75CU8070UXXU

Effectively the same features as the rest of the 8-series Crystal UHD models, this model tops out at 85-inches compared to the CU8000’s 75-inches.

CU8000

  • UE43CU8000KXXU
  • UE50CU8000KXXU
  • UE55CU8000KXXU
  • UE65CU8000KXXU
  • UE75CU8000KXXU
  • UE85CU8000KXXU

The step-down CU8000 is available in the same number of sizes as the CU8500. In fact we can’t see much, if any, difference between it and the CU8500 other than it being cheaper, and that it uses feet instead of a central pedestal.

  • Crystal Processor 4K
  • OTS Lite
  • 20W 2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • Up to 50Hz refresh rate
  • ALLM, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Q-Symphony
  • Motion Xcelerator

CU7110

  • UE43CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE50CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE55CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE58CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE65CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE75CU7100KXXU – check price
  • UE85CU7100KXXU – check price

Another variant, and another set that’s very similar to the other models above and below it in this list. Samsung and Selfridges appear to be the only stores to purchase this model from.

CU7100

  • UE43CU7100KXXU
  • UE50CU7100KXXU
  • UE55CU7100KXXU
  • UE58CU7100KXXU
  • UE65CU7100KXXU
  • UE75CU7100KXXU
  • UE85CU7100KXXU

The entry-level LCD Crystal UHD model is the CU7100. Again, there’s not much that’s different from what’s above. It uses different style feet that lift it higher off the ground, and it loses a USB input. Otherwise, the only significant difference is to do with the sizes and the inclusion of a 58-inch screen, which is a size we don’t see very often at all these days.

  • Crystal Processor 4K
  • OTS Lite
  • 20W 2-channel audio
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • Up to 50Hz refresh rate
  • ALLM, eARC
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Q-Symphony
  • Motion Xcelerator

Samsung TV 2022

QN900B

Samsung’s flagship 8K features a range of improvements on what came before it, the Shape Adaptive Light technology proving especially potent in creating a more three-dimensional image.

As per usual it’s capable of a staggeringly bright 8K image with HDR content, the Infinity screen is another elegantly gorgeous design and the OTS sound system does a fine job of creating a big soundstage with accurately placed effects on screen. There are still issues with backlighting, despite the Mini LED panel and it does need good quality sources to shine, but this is one of the most high-performing LCD TVs available. It’s a great showcase for what LCD technology can do.

read our review of the Samsung QN900B

QN800B

The step-down 8K model from Samsung is cheaper and isn’t as bright with regards its HDR performance (a max of 3000 nits compared to the QN900B’s 4000).

Nevertheless, it’s still produces a corker of an image with native 8K content, offers a wide range of features suitable for gaming at ultra-high def resolution and the design is another elegantly slim effort that’s easy to hang on the wall. Like the QN900B it does suffer from backlighting issues and there are limits to its upscaling when dealing with lower resolution content.

read our review of the Samsung QN800B

QN700B

The entry-level 8K model in Samsung’s 2022 line-up sees brightness drop to around 2000 nits maximum but it is the cheapest 8K TV that Samsung offers.

It boasts a similar design as the models above but it doesn’t the same processor, packing the Neo Quantum Processor 8K Lite version. It appears that the set’s upscaling, contrast performance is not as strong as either the QN800B and QN900B, and viewing angles aren’t as wide either.

QN95B

Sitting at the top of Samsung’s 4K tree is the QN95B. It shares some features with the 8K models in that it supports the OneConnect feature whereby all the connections, power and processing is stored in a box that clips on to the back of the TV’s stand.

Like all the Neo QLED TVs, the QN95B supports Mini LED backlight, the Infinity One slim screen design, Dolby Atmos audio and 2000 nits of peak brightness for HDR content. We found this TV delivered absolutely spectacular HDR images, taking LCD tech to another level for film fans and gamers. There are issues, notably the Smart system isn’t as helpful as intended, there are still traces of blooming at wider angles and there’s no Dolby Vision support either.

read our review of the Samsung QN95B

QN90B

The QN90B is the step down model from the QN95B and as is per usual from Samsung, there are a few performance and design downgrades to note.

The Mini LED panel doesn’t feature the same number of local dimming zones, so contrast and black levels are slightly affected. It also doesn’t come with the OneConnect box, though that doesn’t appear to have affected the slimness of the TV (which is slimmer than most OLEDs).

Like the QN95B, the QN90B puts in a vibrant HDR performance, though at times there’s so much brightness that it can be overwhelming in terms of picture accuracy. Gaming is excellent with class-leading levels of latency and upscaling of lower quality sources is good. The Tizen Smart interface is an area of improvement, especially in terms of responsivenss.

read our review of Samsung QN90B

QN85B

Another Neo QLED and, you guessed it, the performance is not as strong as the models above it, but the caveat is that this model is available at a more affordable price.

The main differences lie in the design: the stand is different (a central, smaller pedestal), which should make it easier to position on furniture with smaller footprint. It’s not available in as many sizes (there is no 50- or 43-inch model), the viewing angle technology is not as wide, and it only has OTS sound instead of OTS (which adds side-firing speakers).

This is another TV we tested and we praised its elegant looks, performance with current-gen game consoles as well as its bright, vibrant and mostly detailed pictures. Where it falls down is in its ability to discern detail in black tones, making them look rather formless and the same.

read our review of the Samsung QN85B

Q80B

The Q80B marks the divide between Samsung’s Neo QLED and QLED TVs, the QN80B falling into the clutches of the latter.

That means there’s no support for Mini LED backlight technology but it does still boast a Direct Full Array screen, so while it may not have as many dimming zones, it has enough to be able to offer reasonable control over black levels and brightness for its price. Brightness is quoted at 1500 nits.

The design is different, mostly in terms of the pedestal it stands on. The processor at its heart is the step down Quantum Processor, so we wouldn’t expect upscaling to be as comprehensive. This TV does have Samsung’s ‘basic’ Smart Calibration feature, though, which pretty much sets up the picture in accordance with the environment it’s in. Game-wise this boasts a similar set of features, with AMD FreeSync Premium Pro among the options for gamers.

Q75B

The Q75B has a different stand and there’s no mention of peak brightness, which is confirmation in itself that it’s not as bright as the Q80B.

There is 4K/120 frame rate support for gaming on this TV, interestingly, as well as FreeSync Premium Pro for PC gaming. There’s no built-in Dolby Atmos support for this screen, and the TV ships with the OTS Lite sound system. This alludes to the TV using a combination of physical and virtual speakers to track audio across the screen.

There’s no Direct Local Dimming present, using Samsung’s Dual LED technology to tackle brightness and contrast. In short, the Q75B won’t be as exact when it comes to displaying black levels or wide-ranging contrast.

Q70B

Dropping down to the Q70B and we have a screen that’s available in more sizes than the Q70B, so if you truly wanted to go big, then there’s the option to go for the 85-inch set.

Performance and features appear to be line with the Q75B, the only thing that we note is some missing features such as the Smart Calibration and the Mini Map Zoom feature that’s been integrated into the Gaming Hub within the Tizen interface.

Q60B

We come to the entry-level QLED model for 2022 and the most obvious differences is that this design uses feet instead of a central pedestal (so consider a wide piece of furniture depending on the size). Also, it’s available in a number of different sizes, ranging from 43- to 85-inches.

The processor is downgraded to the Quantum Processor Lite (so set expectations according with regards to its picture performance). There’s no viewing angle technology (sitting head on likely provides the best performance) and for gaming there appears to be no VRR support of any kind.

BU8500

The BU8500 is leader of the Crystal UHD pack but expect this set to FOCUS more on value over outright performance compared to the QLED models above it.

Sizes range from 43- to 75-inches, there are just three HDMI ports and the refresh rate is limited to 50Hz. With no local dimming provided, this set uses digital processing to create its sense of contrast and black levels, especially with the Contrast Enhancer feature that darkens black levels and increases the luminance of brighter areas.

Don’t expect this to be big on gaming features, with just ALLM and HGiG HDR support present.

BU8510

The difference between the BU8510 is both small and significant. It lacks a few picture features (the LED Clear Motion is missing but in our experience that’s no big loss), like all of Samsung’s TVs there’s support for the trio of voice assistants in Alexa, Google Assistant and Samung’s own Bixby.

The significant differences are in the wider stand (which also comes in white), and the number of sizes is fewer; only 43- and 50-inch sizes are available.

Samsung’s 2022 TV lineup: OLED screens and 8K LCDs

BU8000

Last on the block is the BU8000, the cheapest model in the current Crystal UHD line-up. It features the AirSlim design that all the Crystal UHD models feature, which makes it suitable for wall-mounting.

The design differs it that it has feet towards the edges of the screen (again, you’ll want to consider the width of the furniture this screen is placed on), and it comes with just the three HDMI inputs, one of which is placed facing out from the rear, not too helpful when it comes to wall-mounting.

We have reviewed this TV and felt it delivered good value for a 65-inch screen but that’s mitigated by a lacklustre image, sluggish Smart TV interface and the fact that Samsung’s 2021 Crystal UHD sets are still available, and in some cases offer better performance.

read our review of the Samsung BU8000

Frame 2022

Samsung continues with its lifestyle-focused Frame TV series. It functions like any other TV when switched on, but can show pieces of framed art via Art Mode. It integrates the same QLED display tech seen in the standard QLED range, so viewers will be getting a similar level of picture quality.

Serif 2022

The Serif TV is more for design purists, although it does have a 4K QLED screen. It’s won a few awards including one at the International Forum (iF) Design Awards. This TV offered a colourful picture performance, solid smarts and distinctive design that makes it really good option for interior designs who want something unique in their home. Its HDR performance is limited, and for most people The Serif won’t be the most practical TV to have around.

read our review of The Serif (2022)

Sero

One for the cool kid crowd, the Sero is a new lifestyle QLED TV with a unique feature. It can rotate between horizontal and vertical orientations like a smartphone can, so viewers can enjoy a whole range of content that are vertical in scope, as well as catering for normal, landscape content. It’s only available in 43-inch size, but comes with 60W of sound for a 4.1 channel presentation.

The Terrace

The Terrace is a TV built for the outdoors. It has IP55 water and dust resistance, high HDR peak brightness of 2000 nits to nullify some of that brightness from sunlight. There’s wide viewing angle technology, useful if there’s more than one person watching and the frame is made out of metal, adding to the set’s durability.

Other include the Tizen-based Eden smarts and HDR10 support. There’s also a HDBaseT receiver for long distance audio, video and power transmission through a single cable. Fancy a soundbar, too? Samsung has made the Terrace soundbar, which comes with water resistant features.

Samsung TV 2021

QN85A

This is the last of the 2021 Neo QLED branded TVs. The QN85A’s picture and sound features see a slight downgrade in specs. HDR performance is said to be less bright, while the audio system is arrayed in a more standard OTS configuration (we’re looking to confirm this).

The design of the stand differs from than the premium Neo QLED models and can accommodate a soundbar (preferably a Samsung one). It remains available in a few sizes, but like all 2021 models, availability is low and in some cases either is a second hand or refurbished model.

infinity, screen, samsung, 2021
  • read our Samsung QE55QN85A review
  • Neo Quantum Processor 4K
  • Quantum Matrix
  • Wide Viewing Angle/Anti-Reflection
  • OTS
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • NeoSlim Design
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync Premium Pro
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

AU9000

Our 2021 ‘Best affordable TV’ winner is still available in a number of sizes and at cheaper than before. Value and performance are the main aims here with its Crystal Processor ramping up colour reproduction over 4K UHD TVs, and there’s gaming support with its Motion Xcelerator Turbo feature and the Super UltraWide GameView and Game Bar that enables switching between 21:9 and 32:9 screen ratios.

Otherwise there are the ‘Lite’ versions of the Q-Symphony and OTS audio technologies, so this TV will rely on some digital wizardry for audio.

We’ve reviewed this model and said that it was “excellent with native 4K content, upscales 1080p stuff confidently, and has one of the best Smart TV interfaces around.”

  • read our review of the Samsung UE50AU9000
  • Crystal Processor 4K
  • OTS Lite
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • 4K/120fps, ALLM, VRR, eARC
  • AirSlim Design
  • Multi View (2 screens)
  • Super Ultrawide GameView Game Bar
  • Q-Symphony
  • AMD FreeSync
  • Motion Xcelerator Turbo

AU7100

The AU7100 is the entry-level LED LCD TV for 2021. Aside from the Tizen-based Eden Smart interface, there aren’t many Smart features (no built-in voice assistants, no Multi View); the visual features are rather standard (Samsung’s PurColor technology) and the audio features are the ‘Lite’ version in most cases. If you’re looking for a cheap, no-frills telly; this would be the one.

  • Crystal Processor 4K
  • Pur Color
  • HDR10, HDR10, HLG
  • ALLM, eARC
  • Bezel-Less Design
  • Q-Symphony Lite
  • Motion Xcelerator

The 6 Best Flat Screen TVs. Summer 2023 Reviews

Nearly all TVs sold now are flat-screen TVs. Curved TVs screens were once more popular, but they’re increasingly hard to find now. Modern flat screens have gotten thinner and bigger; some are designed to look like pieces of art that blend into your décor when wall-mounted. Finding the best TV depends on your needs and what you’ll be watching; the most important aspects of picture quality for watching the big game with a large group of friends in a bright room are different from watching a movie in a basement home theater with a few people.

We’ve bought and tested more than 390 TVs over the last nine years, and below, you’ll find our recommendations for the best TVs with a flat screen. Check out our recommendations for the best TVs, the best TVs for Xbox Series X, and the best TVs for PS5. Most brands have started releasing their 2023 lineups, so vote on which ones you want us to buy and test. To learn more about the 2023 models, check out our 2023 TV lineup page.

Best Flat Screen TV

Samsung S95B OLED

The best flat-screen TV we’ve tested is the Samsung S95B OLED. This remarkable TV delivers incredible picture quality, with deep inky blacks that look amazing in a dark room. Its near-infinite contrast ratio allows it to display incredibly bright highlights when watching HDR content, with no blooming or haloing around bright highlights in dark scenes. Its QD-OLED panel also lets it display bright and vivid colors, meaning the latest HDR content looks incredibly vibrant. It has an incredibly thin profile that looks amazing, but it’s so thin that there are reports of the panel bending, so if you decide to mount it, you’ll have to take extra precautions. It’s been replaced by the Samsung S95C OLED in 2023, which offers similar picture quality but with a sleeker and slimmer design that doesn’t stick out as much when wall-mounted. It’s significantly more expensive, so the S95B is still better.

Best Upper Mid-Range Flat Screen TV

Samsung QN90B QLED

If you usually watch TV in a bright room, an LED TV with higher peak brightness, like the Samsung QN90B QLED, is better than the Samsung S95B OLED. It’s an excellent TV overall, with fantastic picture quality. It gets extremely bright, meaning it can handle a lot more glare than the S95B. It looks good in a dark room, but there’s noticeable blooming around bright areas of the screen. It runs the same great Smart interface as the S95B, with a huge selection of streaming apps. It even supports Xbox Cloud Gaming, allowing you to play streaming Xbox games directly on a TV without needing an expensive console. It delivers a fantastic movie-watching experience, with deep blacks thanks to its Mini LED backlight and a wide color gamut, so the latest HDR content pops the way the creator intended. It also has a wide viewing angle, but it’s not as wide as the S95B. It’s been replaced by the Samsung QN90C/QN90CD QLED, a similar TV to its predecessor, but that is currently much more expensive, so it’s not worth a purchase while the QN90B is still widely available.

Best Mid-Range Flat Screen TV

LG C2 OLED

The best mid-range flat-screen TV we’ve tested is the LG C2 OLED. It’s an excellent all-around TV that delivers stunning picture quality and performs well for any use. OLEDs can turn off individual pixels, resulting in a near-infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. There’s no blooming around bright objects on a dark background, making it a fantastic choice for watching content in dark rooms. It has great features, whether gaming or simply streaming your favorite content. The built-in LG webOS interface is easy-to-use and has a ton of apps available to download, and the included Magic Remote makes it easy to navigate through the menus. It has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, variable refresh rate (VRR) support, low input lag, and a near-instantaneous response time for a smooth gaming experience. The WOLED panel it uses isn’t as colorful in HDR content as the QD-OLED panel in the Samsung S95B OLED, but it still looks great. The LG C3 OLED is now out and is only a marginal improvement over its predecessor but with added DTS audio format support. Unless you want DTS, it’s just not worth the price increase over the C2.

Best Lower Mid-Range Flat Screen TV

Hisense U8H

The best mid-range flat-screen TV is the Hisense U8H. It’s an impressive TV that looks great in any viewing environment. Although it can’t produce blacks as deep and inky as the LG C2 OLED, it still has an outstanding contrast ratio and an impressive Mini LED full array local dimming feature, so there’s very little blooming around bright objects in dark scenes. It’s incredibly bright and has excellent reflection handling, so it’s a great choice for a bright living room with many Windows. The built-in Google TV interface is easy to use and has a great selection of streaming apps through the Google Play Store, so you’re sure to find your favorite content. It’s also great for console gamers, with 4k @ 120Hz gaming support on two of its four HDMI ports. You’ll also find a great selection of gaming features, including FreeSync variable refresh rate technology support, ensuring a smooth, nearly tear-free gaming experience.

Best Budget Flat Screen TV

TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED

The best budget flat-screen TV we’ve tested is the TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED. It’s a surprisingly good budget TV that delivers a great overall experience. It’s an impressive TV for watching movies in a dark room thanks to its superb contrast ratio, fantastic black uniformity, and decent local dimming feature, meaning blacks appear deep and uniform in a dark room. It also has impressive peak brightness and decent reflection handling, making it an equally good choice for a bright room. It’s available in a wide range of sizes, and even the largest model is available at a budget price, so you can get the size that fits your needs. It runs the Roku OS interface, which is pretty basic but easy to use, and has a good selection of streaming apps. By going with a budget model like this one over the Hisense U8H, you’re sacrificing a bit on picture quality, but the biggest difference is for gamers, as it’s limited to a 60Hz refresh rate. It’s still great for gaming, but you can’t take full advantage of the Xbox Series X or PS5, as these consoles now have some games running at or near 120fps when in their ‘performance’ modes.

Best Cheap Flat Screen TV

Hisense A6H

You can still get an enjoyable TV experience without spending a lot. If you’re on a tight budget, the best cheap flat-screen TV we’ve tested is the Hisense A6H. It runs the Google TV interface, with many streaming apps available. It makes it a great choice for an office or guest bedroom, as your guests can watch their favorite shows without you having to worry about buying an extra streaming stick. It also has a wide viewing angle, so the image remains consistent when viewed from the sides, making it a great choice if you like watching TV while walking around. Of course, as expected for a cheap TV, it delivers worse picture quality than the other models on this list. It delivers just basic picture quality and isn’t a good choice for a dark room. It has a low contrast ratio, and at this price point, you’re losing out on advanced features like local dimming to improve the appearance of dark scenes. It also can’t display a wide color gamut, so although it supports Dolby Vision HDR, this adds little to your viewing experience.

Recent Updates

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best flat screen TVs available to buy for most people in each price range.

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our reviews of flat screen TVs. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no TV is perfect, most TVs are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

The best Samsung TV 2023: our top Samsung QLED, Neo QLED, and 8K picks

Samsung’s 2023 TVs are now rolling in. The new Samsung S95C claims the top spot thanks to its fantastic, super bright picture, making it a perfect TV for both movie lovers and gamers.

However, the rest of our list is (so far this year) filled with slightly older models as they often offer better value than the equivalent new models thanks to the big price cuts they’ve received since launch.

Matt Bolton, Managing Editor – Entertainment

The best Samsung TVs are at the top of the TV pile in terms of build, picture quality, and features. But it’s worth bearing in mind the best Samsung TV for you isn’t always the most expensive model in the line-up, there’s much more to choose from.

For example, we’re big fans of the Samsung QN900B 8K QLED TV if you’re after stunning 8K pictures and it sits in the third spot in this list and features in our best TVs guide. However, Samsung makes plenty of other TVs. Although the biggest, most high-tech sets are exciting, they’re not going to make sense for every living room or budget.

We’ve reviewed hundreds of TVs over the years from all the key brands, and that means we know how the best Samsung TVs compare to the competition as well as to each other. In our guide you’ll find every kind of Samsung TV, from the most affordable 4K TVs to massive mini-LEDs with huge screens, and its new generation of OLED TVs.

infinity, screen, samsung, 2021

If you have your heart set on a particular size but aren’t wedded to a brand such as Samsung, take a look at our best 55-inch TVs and best 65-inch TVs guides for some more options from some of TV’s biggest names. Otherwise, read on for our picks of the best Samsung TVs to help you find your new favourite, and also check out our hands-on reviews of the company’s new for 2023 QN95C 4K and QN900C 8K Neo QLED models, and its S95C OLED to get a preview of what the company will be introducing this year.

The best Samsung TV 2023

Reasons to avoid

The Samsung S95C is a wonderfully bright OLED, which takes the top spot in our best Samsung TVs guide after we awarded it an impressive five out of five stars in our review. It replaces the S95B, which still sits in the fourth spot below, with a whole range of upgrades.

This TV impresses in almost every way. It’s sleek and incredibly slim, making it a good choice for wall mounting. Sound quality has had a big step up from its predecessor too. However, what really stands out about the Samsung S95C is the super bright picture. Samsung has bumped up the brightness 40% more than the S95B, making it one of our top picks if you want a Samsung TV and incredibly bright pictures are a priority for you.

During our testing we found the brightness was highly effective at taking HDR video to a new level of drama and realism, unlocking levels of colour volume and purity, even in bright colour areas, we’ve never seen before on an OLED TV. We highly recommend the Samsung S95C for movie lovers considering the fantastic picture, sharpness, great viewing angles and fantastic upscaling. However, gamers will also be happy with extensive 4K/120Hz support and an ultra fast 9.2ms response time.

Reasons to avoid

The Samsung BU8500 is designed to offer some up-to-the-minute functionality, discreet looks, and rock-solid build quality at a price that the majority of us won’t baulk at. And it absolutely nails that. It’s an impressive 4K HDR LED display with good HDR (although as ever with Samsung, no Dolby Vision HDR), three HDMIs, voice control, two remotes and a Tizen Smart TV interface with all the streaming apps you might want. It’s easily one of the best TVs under £1,000.

This is an exceptionally affordable TV, and while building affordable TVs does mean some compromises, Samsung hasn’t cut any important corners here. The Crystal 4K processor does a decent job of upscaling, albeit not to the same degree as the processors in Samsung’s best TVs, and the backlighting is accurate with good brightness and contrast. During our testing, we noted that the sound quality isn’t brilliant, but you need a soundbar for most TVs these days.

The BU8500 features three HDMI 2.0 inputs including one with eARC for a soundbar. There’s compatibility with the ALLM and HGiG aspects of next-gen games console specification, but there’s no support for AMD FreeSync, which is a step backwards from 2021‘s Samsung AU9000.

Samsung has made a very impressive TV for an equally impressive price, and while it’s not up there with the firm’s very best models it punches way above its price tag. If you’re looking for a more affordable 4K TV this should definitely be on your shortlist.

Reasons to avoid

8K is too much TV for many front rooms, but if you have the space and budget there’s no doubt that the Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV takes home entertainment to a whole new level. Samsung’s Mini LED-sporting QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV offers stunning picture quality, exceptional color and brightness, terrific sound and outstanding black levels. It looks pretty good when it’s switched off too.

The technology inside this TV’s display panel is Samsung’s ‘Quantum’ Mini LED. Those LEDs are 1/40th the thickness of a regular LED, meaning thousands of smaller LEDs can be packed together more tightly than in other LED TVs. That means more accurate dimming, enabling the Samsung to deliver black levels that to our eyes are almost indistinguishable to those of an OLED display.

That’s because another benefit of smaller LEDs is that they are more precise and less prone to blooming, which is when light goes where you don’t want it to go. With this TV, you won’t see bright areas of the screen unnaturally bleed over into darker spots. And because it also has Samsung’s Multi-Intelligence AI upscaling, the QN900A can deliver images that look much better than their source.

So why did we dock it half a star in our review? The short answer: the software. Samsung’s new Smart Hub UI feels like a step backwards, making previously simple adjustments more time-consuming and complex. While the TV itself is spectacular, the Smart Hub isn’t. But that’s a minor issue, and we still think that this is the best Samsung TV you can buy in 2023 if you’re looking for stunning 8K images.

Reasons to avoid

The Samsung QN95B Neo QLED’s design picks up on the so-called Infinity theme of its predecessor, the lauded Samsung QN95A, with a barely-there frame around the screen, and a slim rear that’s as flat as the front, creating a striking monolithic effect. During our testing we found all of these design features combine to make the QN95B look suitably premium.

Picture quality is fantastic. Improved processing and backlight controls deliver marked improvements in most picture areas to the already impressive efforts of the QN95A Mini LED debutant, with less blooming, more brightness and better shadow detailing particularly catching the eye. In our Samsung QN95B review we wrote: With its extreme brightness and vibrant Quantum Dot color system, the QN95B delivers a dazzling demonstration of just how much of a difference HDR can make to picture quality

This picture quality holds across both gaming and video sources this year. While its sound doesn’t excel as much as its pictures do, its Object Tracking Sound technology makes it a perfectly adequate partner for the stellar pictures.

The bad news? Samsung’s revamp of its Tizen Smart system was a misstep, adding unnecessary complication and some unhelpful design decisions to its clean and engaging predecessor. Overall, though, the picture improvements are so irresistible that a bit of pain on the smarts front and even quite a lot of pain on the wallet front can’t detract from its brilliance.

Reasons to avoid

If you want the brightness of an LED TV with something close to the visual quality of OLED, Samsung has just the TV for you. The QN85B uses a ridiculously bright mini-LED panel to deliver very impressive HDR and great gaming performance, and while it can’t match the deepest blacks of an OLED set you might be surprised by just how close it comes.

This is a particularly good option for gamers thanks to HDMI 2.1 support across all of its HDMI ports, and there are six speakers inside to give you reasonable spatial audio if you don’t have one of the best soundbars.

The visuals here are very, very good once you move away from Samsung’s overly bright and overly processed display presets; we found that Movie mode is almost as accurate as Filmmaker Mode but doesn’t require you to sacrifice too much brightness in the name of visual accuracy.

There are the usual Samsung downsides here – the lack of Dolby Vision HDR, the redesigned Tizen Smart TV interface that’s slightly more annoying than its predecessor, the choice of a stripped-down solar remote or a really horrible plasticky one that has all the features on it – but this is a very fast, responsive and bright TV that’s excellent for watching in daylight, making it a great choice for gaming, sports or just social watching.

Just watch where you put it if you like to watch gloomy movies at night: Samsung’s current mini-LEDs seem to be more reflective than its previous QLED TVs, and we’ve found that if we don’t turn off most of the ambient light in our front room we can see the lights’ reflections in our mini-LED TV’s panel.

Reasons to avoid

Samsung The Frame (2020) was the most accomplished iteration of Samsung’s painting-inspired television we’d seen when it launched, and it still holds up today – not least because now there are newer versions, the price has dropped considerably.

With a bold metal casing, customizable frames, and an Art Mode function that displays classic artworks and photographs, The Frame is the closest any television gets to looking like an actual painting – and when it’s wall-mounted your guests really might not be able to tell the difference.

With an Ambient Mode offering more dynamic screensavers, clock faces, and weather or news updates, there’s plenty of customization for how much attention you want your Frame TV to get when not in use. The QLED panel and Quantum Processor 4K upgrade are worthy improvements too, with predictably above-par upscaling and an impactful picture – although while it’s generally impressive, the display panel is surprisingly dim for a QLED and skin tones can sometimes seem a little bit off.

But if you want a television that really puts appearances first, and will blend in seamlessly with the decor throughout the day – and that has a OneConnect box cabling solution to keep things tidy – Samsung The Frame (2020) is an excellent choice for your home. Do take a look at newer versions if you want the latest Samsung The Frame has to offer, otherwise we think the 2020 version is excellent value for money.

Reasons to avoid

The Samsung Q60B QLED TV starts from a much cheaper price than Samsung’s other QLED sets, but its spec sheet includes Quantum Dot colors, a comprehensive Smart system, and so-called Object Tracking Sound technology.

Picture quality starts well, with the Q60B producing more brightness and Quantum Dot-inspired color punch than the vast majority of cheap TV rivals. Its playback of native 4K sources is also impressively crisp most of the time, too – especially welcome on the 55-inch size that we tested for our Samsung Q60B review. It doesn’t miss out compared to the best 4K TVs for Ultra HD content.

This is a very cheap TV, however, and that means of course there are going to be compromises. The motion processing isn’t as natural as it is on Samsung’s more premium sets, and grey scenes are rather flat. Nevertheless, the Samsung Q60B is still one of the best TVs under £1000 due to its winning combination of good picture quality and a super-low price.

How to choose the best Samsung TV

Why you can trust TechRadar

We spend hours testing every product or service we review, so you can be sure you’re buying the best. Find out more about how we test.

With so many models to choose from, finding the best Samsung TV for you isn’t always easy. But before you dive into the detailed specs of each model, here are a few key things we think you need to consider.

The first is budget. You might be able to bump up the price you can spend a little if you find the perfect TV – or find a great deal in the Black Friday sales – but it’s a good idea to set a limit to begin with so you don’t fall in love with the unrivalled images and features of a TV that’s well above your budget.

Next up: size. It’s tempting to always assume bigger is better when it comes to TVs. However, the size of the screen you should buy needs to be dictated by how far away you’ll be sitting from it.

Many manufacturers, including Samsung, recommend sitting between 1.5 and 2.5 times the TV’s diagonal screen size to find your perfect viewing spot. Get out the tape measure and ensure you have enough space to fit the TV and enough room between the TV and where you plan to sit.

In our best Samsung TV guide above, there are also a range of panel types – like LED and QLED – and HDR capabilities to consider.

Finally, if you’re willing to buy a soundbar, you don’t need to agonise about audio. However, if you’d like an all-in-one cinema system, consider a TV that delivers great audio as well as a fantastic picture, like the Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K.

And do you even need a Samsung TV? There’s a lot to love about Samsung’s TVs, but it may also be worth your time to take a look at our best LG TV and best Sony TV guides as well.

Are Samsung TVs any good?

Considering you’ve made it this far, we’re guessing you had Samsung in mind. But why else would you look for the best Samsung TV?

You’ll find multiple Samsung TVs across our guides. The flagship models are generally class-leading in terms of technology, while the more affordable options don’t cut the wrong corners; they deliver excellent value for money. Samsung’s Tizen OS is one of the best Smart TV platforms too, although some of us feel that the most recent changes to its user interface were a step backwards rather than forwards. But it’s still an excellent OS.

The one big downside that applies to all current Samsung TVs is that they don’t support Dolby Vision, an HDR format that delivers higher brightness and better colors than HDR10. Samsung TVs support all the other key ones, but it does mean you won’t benefit from Dolby Vision content on devices such as the Xbox Series X.

That’s a minor niggle, though. The sheer size of Samsung’s TV range – and its constant launching of even better models – means that the firm offers multiple high quality models in ever major market sector and at every price point too. If you’re looking for good quality without breaking the bank, Samsung TVs definitely get our seal of approval.

Is QLED better than OLED?

With both QLED and OLED vying for your attention, it can be tricky to know what’s best for your situation. We’ve broken down the differences in our OLED and QLED guide. But it’s also fairly easy to summarise. QLED use LED backlights to illuminate the screen and OLED’s pixels illuminate individually. That means OLED typically offers much better black and grey reproduction than QLED, but QLED is significantly brighter.

Until fairly recently Samsung was sticking firmly with LED technology rather than OLED, so while firms such as LG were building their brands on high performance OLED displays Samsung concentrated instead on its brighter, more responsive and more affordable Quantum Dot LEDs, or QD-LED for short. Samsung has also brought some very impressive mini-LED TVs to market, and its latest flagships are QD-OLED. That means they have the incredible contrast of OLED TVs but the brightness of QD-LED, which for many buyers means they offer the best of both worlds.

If you’re buying on a budget, QLED definitely gives you more brightness for your buck than the equivalent OLED – but if you’re a fan of old movies and want to see them as the director and cinematographer intended, OLED is a better bet. And if you can’t decide? We’re pretty impressed by Samsung’s mini-LED, and we’ll like QD-OLED even more when the come down.

How do Samsung TVs compare to other manufacturers?

Samsung QLED, mini-LED and QD-OLED TVs are known to be some of the brightest, most color-saturated televisions on the planet. With Tizen built-in, they’re well-stocked with the latest apps, and most of the mid-range and high-end models have high levels of quality control. However, budget models make some concessions and generally don’t look as good as models from TCL or Hisense, but are in line with LG’s cheaper TVs.

We feel Sony does a better job overall with motion handling and LG seems to understand how to do upscaling the best of the big three, but Samsung remains competent in all major areas with no real weak spots.

What’s the newest Samsung TV?

This answer will become out of date before you’ve finished reading it: Samsung releases an astonishing number of new models every year. The 2022 flagships for the money-no-object crowd are its 89-inch, 101-inch and 110-inch microLED displays, but our pick of the 2022 models remain the Neo QLED displays. Those models are incredibly bright Quantum Dot mini-LED displays and are available in both 4K and 8K versions.

The fun and unusual Samsung The Frame TV was refreshed in 2022, and as before it becomes a wall-hung work of art when you’re not watching anything. There’s also the Samsung The Terrace for outdoor viewing.

The big thing for Samsung now is its OLED TVs, and we’ve got a whole guide on whether you should buy a Samsung OLED TV.

What’s next for the best Samsung TVs?

Samsung’s adventures with mini-LED, micro-LED and QD-OLED are still relatively new, and we’d expect Samsung to continue making more models with those technologies in the coming year. Samsung’s been pushing gaming hard too, with the Xbox Cloud gaming app appearing in its newer TVs and a growing number of TVs sporting HDMI 2.1 ports with the key gaming features for the top consoles.

How we test the best Samsung TVs

TVs don’t always deliver in the way manufacturers claim they might be able to, which is why we test every single TV we recommend. However, when it comes to the best Samsung TVs there are many devices to consider, so we have our work cut out.

For starters, we put all of the best Samsung TVs in this list to the test with standard def, 1080p, 4K and even 8K content resolutions to see how they perform.

As we do, we’re looking for clarity and exceptional picture quality, we’re making a note of brightness levels and the vibrancy of colors on the screen.

To do this, we spend some time fine-tuning the settings, but we’re big believers that TVs shouldn’t need hours of near-professional tweaking to work. We simply want to ensure that we’re calibrating the TVs we test so we get the most from them.

We’ll assess the additional features that are built-in, rate how well Smart assistants do and make sure that all of the most popular streaming apps work well.

We also spend time assessing the audio quality. Most TVs need an accompanying soundbar or sound system to work well, but some Samsung TVs, like the Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K for instance, deliver exceptional built-in sound too.

While considering all of these factors, and many more, we spend serious time with the TV. This ensures we can make personal recommendations based on our experiences of the viewing angles, brightness levels at different times of day and everything else you just can’t glean from a spec sheet.

We’ve tested many TVs over the years, so we know what we’re looking for and what separates a solid performance from a stellar one. That means we’ll also provide broader context and, where appropriate, suggest other brands you might want to consider alongside the best Samsung TVs.