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The Huawei ban explained: A complete timeline and everything you need to know

If you’ve been following the tech industry over the past few years, you no doubt know that Huawei is in a heap of trouble. Since May 2019, the Chinese company has been under fire from the United States government, resulting in what is colloquially referred to as the “Huawei ban.” This ongoing battle has forced Huawei to change its business practices drastically.

If you are curious as to how the Huawei-US ban came to be, the details surrounding the ban, and what it means for Huawei going forward, this is the place to be.

Below, you’ll find all the integral info related to the ban. We’ve also got some helpful tips specifically related to Huawei’s smartphones and how the ban affects both current and future handsets.

Editor’s note: This Huawei ban summary is current as of April 2023. Since this is an ongoing situation, we will regularly update it with new content. However, for the most up-to-date info on Huawei, we advise you to check our latest Huawei news articles.

Why is Huawei banned? A (very) quick summary

Although this article is an in-depth examination of the Huawei ban, you might be happy with a shortened version of the story. The basic gist is as follows:

  • Huawei is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the world. At the start of 2019, the company was expected to become the world’s largest smartphone manufacturer by the end of that year, stealing the crown from Samsung.
  • Despite this success, Huawei has dealt with numerous accusations over the years of shady business practices. It also has been accused — although with no hard proof — of using its products to spy on other nations. This is a worrisome thought considering the company’s close ties to the Chinese government.
  • In May 2019, then-United States President Donald Trump announced that Huawei — along with several other Chinese companies — was now on something called the Entity List. Companies on this list are unable to do business with any organization that operates in the United States.
  • The Huawei ban thus begins, with Huawei suddenly unable to work with companies such as Google, Qualcomm, and Intel, among many others. In the case of Google, this means new Huawei smartphones are no longer able to ship with Google-owned applications pre-installed.

With the Huawei-US ban in effect, the company has had to completely revamp how it creates and releases smartphones. It also faces mounting scrutiny from other nations, many of which rely on Huawei for wireless networking equipment.

Since May 2019, Huawei has had some minor wins, but the bulk of the ban is still in place. It appears the Huawei ban will be in effect in perpetuity, and the company will need to strategize around it until further notice.

Yes, despite Donald Trump’s exit from the White House, the Huawei ban remains in effect. We will have to wait and see if it is repealed in the future — though it seems unlikely.

The Huawei ban went into effect on May 15, 2019, as part of an executive order from then-president Donald Trump. The order banned the use of telecommunications equipment from foreign firms that are deemed national security risks.

No, although Donald Trump is no longer president, his executive order remains in effect. Huawei is still releasing flagship devices in Europe and Asia, but they are not available in the United States.

It does not appear as though the US has any plans to end the Huawei ban at this time. According to Reuters, President Biden signed the Secure Equipment Act in November 2021, which prevents companies from receiving equipment licenses from US regulators.

No, the Huawei ban only affects products released after May 15, 2019. The Huawei P30 Pro launched on March 26, 2019, which means it can still feature Google apps.

Huawei history: The background info you need

In the grand scheme of things, Huawei is a relatively young company. Ren Zhengfei started Huawei in 1987 after he was discharged from the People’s Liberation Army in China. Zhengfei’s military history helped Huawei get some of its first big contracts. This is one of the main reasons Huawei is viewed as a de facto branch of the Chinese government.

Huawei has faced scrutiny from the beginning for allegedly stealing intellectual property. In brief, the company would be accused repeatedly over the decades of stealing technology from other companies and then passing it off as its own. There are a few times in which this has been proven, such as with a 2003 case filed by Cisco, but there are many other times where accusations didn’t lead to confirmation.

In the late 2000s, Huawei was growing at an incredibly fast pace. The company started acquiring other companies to expand its operations. Several times, it attempted to buy non-Chinese companies, and regulatory bodies would block the sale. This happened in the US and the UK, among other areas. Each time, the reasoning behind the block would be related to Huawei’s deep ties to China and the possible security threat that represents.

Eventually, Huawei started making smartphones. Its phones became popular immediately as they were well-designed devices with very reasonable price tags. In 2016, Huawei boasted it would be the world’s largest smartphone manufacturer within five years. By 2018, it had taken second place ahead of Apple and just behind Samsung. This is a remarkable feat considering Huawei was handicapped by not having any presence in the United States, now the world’s third-largest market.

Donald Trump, China, and the ongoing trade war

While Huawei was growing at an astounding rate in 2018, all was not well in regard to its home country. Donald Trump started to flex his power as POTUS to combat China and its “unfair trade practices,” as he called them. This began the still-ongoing US/China trade war.

Although the trade war has a lot to do with politics, tariffs, and international law, it also touches on intellectual property theft. Since Huawei has a reputation as a repeat offender when it comes to IP theft, this put the company in Trump’s crosshairs.

A major aspect of the US/China trade war is IP theft, something that has dogged Huawei’s reputation for decades.

However, critics at the time noted that a long-term US/China trade war would hurt both countries significantly. Because of this, it was assumed that Trump would try to strongarm deals from China that would be advantageous to the US and then be done with it. This isn’t how things went, though.

Despite the fact that the trade war is associated very closely with Donald Trump, it is actually one of the few moves he made during his presidency with bipartisan support. Current US President Joe Biden has made no efforts to remove the Huawei ban or weaken the US/China trade war. Members of his staff and the people he appointed have also signaled support for continuing the ban.

In other words, Huawei isn’t out of the woods even with Trump out of the White House.

The Huawei ban begins on May 15, 2019

On May 15, 2019, President Trump issued an executive order that bans the use of telecommunications equipment from foreign firms deemed a national security risk. The order itself doesn’t mention Huawei (or even China) specifically. However, the US Department of Commerce created what it refers to as an “Entity List” related to the order that does contain Huawei’s name.

Since the order didn’t reference Huawei specifically, its effect on the company and its various lines of business wasn’t totally clear. It appeared the order was mostly directed towards Huawei’s telecom operations, which would mean its wireless networking equipment, especially those related to 5G.

The order also didn’t make it clear whether the US government would help carriers pay for the removal of Huawei equipment. It also didn’t clarify any punishments US companies would face if they didn’t comply with the order. In brief, the Huawei ban seemed serious, but there were too many unknowns to understand where it would go.

Huawei, in a statement to Android Authority that day, said this: “Restricting Huawei from doing business in the US will not make the US more secure or stronger; instead, this will only serve to limit the US to inferior yet more expensive alternatives, leaving the US lagging behind in 5G deployment.” Even this statement made it seem like Trump’s order was only going to apply to Huawei’s networking gear and not its smartphones or other products.

That all changed a few days later.

Goodbye Google: The Huawei Google ban, explained

On Sunday, May 19, 2019, Google publicly declared that it would comply with Trump’s Huawei ban. Interpreting the language of the order, Google determined that the proper course of action would be to cut Huawei off from Google’s suite of digital products.

This meant that Huawei would no longer have access to the fundamentals of Android smartphones. Gmail, YouTube, Google Drive, and even the Google Play Store itself were now no longer available for Huawei to use on new products.

This news sent a shockwave through the tech world. Remember that at this point, Huawei is the second-largest smartphone manufacturer globally, and every single one of its phones runs on Android. Without access to Google apps, millions of Huawei smartphone owners were understandably concerned that their phones would suddenly stop working correctly.

When the dust settled, it became clear that Huawei phones certified by Google and launched before May 15, 2019, would continue to operate as normal. However, any uncertified phones, tablets, or other products released by Huawei after that date would be Google-less.

Not long after Google made its announcement, other US-based companies followed suit. This included Qualcomm, Intel, ARM, Microsoft, and many more.

Huawei tries to fight back

Huawei wasn’t about to take this lying down. Only a few days after the Huawei-US ban took effect, the company had issued several sternly worded statements declaring its intentions to fight the order. By the end of May, the company had filed a legal motion declaring the ban unconstitutional. Towards the end of June 2019, there was a lawsuit against the US Department of Commerce over the Entity List.

Unfortunately, these legal maneuvers didn’t bear much fruit. After all, an executive order from the US president himself isn’t an easy thing to fight.

Interestingly, US-based companies came out in support of Huawei while simultaneously cutting commercial ties. Even Google declared that — if given the opportunity — it would want to continue working with Huawei. Huawei’s biggest telecom rival Ericsson also criticized the ban. In addition, tech industry analysts noted that the Huawei ban hurts US-based companies too, because Huawei is such a massive business.

Huawei found out very quickly that it is not easy to overturn an executive order from the US president.

Eventually, China tried to turn the tables by threatening to create its own Entity List. Huawei then upped the ante by accusing the US of cyberattacks and employee harassment. However, the company supplied no evidence to support these accusations, and they led nowhere.

By mid-2020, Huawei had apparently accepted its fate. It stopped filing new lawsuits and stopped making any public declarations that it’s still trying to overturn the Huawei ban.

In 2021, though, with Trump’s exit from the White House, Huawei started making new attempts. Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei stated that he would welcome a chat with President Biden. Elsewhere, the company filed a new lawsuit against the FCC related to the Huawei ban. However, so far, these efforts have proved fruitless.

Full Huawei ban gets delays, license system established

Not even a week after Trump issued the executive order that kickstarted the Huawei ban, the US issued a 90-day reprieve of the ban’s full effects. This gave Huawei and its clients until August 19, 2019, to make arrangements for the weight of the ban.

As luck would have it, this 90-day reprieve would be extended three consecutive times. By February 2020, Huawei had had nearly a year of living without the full ramifications of the ban. That same month, the US government issued a final 45-day reprieve, allowing the Huawei ban to take full and permanent effect by April 1, 2020. Before that date arrived, Donald Trump signed a law banning rural US carriers from using Huawei equipment.

The US government gave Huawei nearly a year before the ban took full effect. Now, though, all bets are off.

While that was all happening, the US government rolled out a licensing system for US firms that wished to work with Huawei. The government allegedly received 130 applications for licenses but granted none of them. The government stated that licenses would go to companies whose work with Huawei would not pose a security threat. Google — which applied for one of these licenses — apparently didn’t fall into this category.

Towards the end of 2020, companies started to receive approval for partial deals with Huawei. Qualcomm, Sony, and Samsung can sell particular pieces of smartphone manufacturing parts to Huawei. However, these small wins still won’t help the company go back to business as usual.

Harmony OS: The alternative to Android

While Huawei is unable to use Google-owned services and products in its phones, that doesn’t mean it can’t use Android itself. Android is an open-source operating system, which means that any person or company can use it for whatever they like without cost. However, many of the integral features of Android that users rely on aren’t included with “pure” Android and are actually owned by Google.

Theoretically, Huawei could use Google-less Android to power its smartphones and tablets indefinitely. In the background, though, Huawei claimed to have been working on a so-called “Plan B” operating system that would act as a fallback should a situation such as this Huawei ban ever come to pass. On August 9, 2019, the company launched “Plan B” as Harmony OS.

According to Huawei, Harmony OS is based on Linux, which is the same open-source platform on which Android is based. This means that Harmony and Android can share compatibilities with one another. Theoretically, if a developer wished to do the work to make it compatible, any Android app can work within Harmony OS.

Originally, Huawei declared it would only use Harmony OS on Internet of Things (IoT) products. This means it would stick with Android for smartphones. However, the company later asserted that Harmony OS will become akin to a “Huawei OS” that will power pretty much everything it makes. This would free it from ever needing to be concerned about a Huawei-US ban again.

Most would think that a new OS going up against Android and iOS is a fool’s errand. However, Huawei is so huge and has so much influence in China that it’s actually totally capable of pulling that off. Keep in mind that, since Harmony OS is based on Linux, it would also be an open-source operating system. This means other companies could use Harmony OS instead of Android. It’s not at all out of the realm of possibility that other Chinese smartphone companies would adopt Harmony OS on at least some of their devices.

In early 2021, though, Ron Amadeo at Ars Technica gained beta access to an early version of Harmony OS. He discovered that, so far, Harmony OS is pretty much just Android 10 with a few cosmetic alterations. Eventually, Huawei launched some tablets with Harmony OS as its platform and it will eventually launch new Harmony OS smartphones. It also will push Harmony OS to older products in its roster, effectively removing Google-powered Android from its entire portfolio.

Huawei Mate 30 series launches, first flagships without Google

If you’ll remember, the Huawei ban only affects products released after May 15, 2019. That means Huawei’s most recent flagship launch before that date — the Huawei P30 and P30 Pro, which launched on March 26, 2019 — continued to run the full suite of Google apps.

However, Huawei traditionally releases its Mate series — its other family of flagship phones — in the last half of the year. At first, rumors swirled that Huawei simply would skip the Huawei Mate 30 Pro launch. Ultimately, though, it went forward with the launch of a flagship phone without any Google apps whatsoever.

The Huawei Mate 30 Pro was the first bonafide flagship from the company to launch without any Google apps.

For the first few months, the phone was only available in China and several other smaller countries. Eventually, it made its way to the West. The phones received stellar reviews (even here at Android Authority), but few publications would recommend consumers buy the device due to its software shortcomings.

Unbelievably, the Mate 30 series still sold exceptionally well. Never underestimate the enormous population of China supporting one of their own. However, outside of China, the phone only made it into the hands of die-hard Huawei followers.

A workaround: Huawei repackages older devices

Huawei quickly found a loophole related to the Huawei ban and Google’s adherence to Trump’s executive order. The company realized that Google approves Android phones not based on their name or design but only on a few core components — most specifically, the processor. This means that Huawei could rebrand and repackage a phone that Google approved prior to the ban and resell it without violating the order.

Obviously, this wasn’t a long-term solution to the company’s woes. Huawei couldn’t perpetually re-release the P30 Pro over and over again, for example. However, that didn’t stop it from doing just that — twice. First, it issued two new colorways for the P30 Pro series, which it announced in September 2019. Then in early May 2020, it announced its intention to launch what it called the Huawei P30 Pro New Edition, which added yet another new colorway and lowered the price.

Huawei’s then-subsidiary HONOR also got into the re-release game by rebranding a few of its phones. Ultimately, this was a last-ditch effort to milk every dollar out of the most recently approved phones. Google and the US government made no publicized efforts to stop Huawei from doing this.

Huawei in 2020: A very different environment

Throughout 2019 Huawei probably hoped that the US government would either weaken the ban or remove it entirely. However, by the time 2020 came around, there were no indications that the Huawei ban was going to let up any time soon.

This put the company’s standing in the smartphone market in serious doubt. If you’ll remember, Huawei originally boasted in 2016 that it would be the world’s number one smartphone manufacturer by the end of 2020. In early 2019, it was nearly a certainty that it would achieve that goal a full year ahead of schedule. Now, with the Huawei ban, the company’s long-running string of success was poised to come to a screeching halt.

Without Google apps on its phones, Huawei can’t compete outside of China. In 2020, the company needed to start developing a way to fix that problem.

Although the Mate 30 series had sold well in Huawei’s native China and made comfortable sales throughout the rest of the world, it was no runaway success. Consumers outside of China simply aren’t ready for a premium smartphone that can’t access the Google Play Store or even popular third-party apps such as Uber.

Huawei’s answer to this was App Gallery — its proprietary Android apps store. Like the Play Store or Samsung’s Galaxy Store, App Gallery hosts a bunch of Android apps you can install on your phone. Huawei is spending millions on enticing developers to port their apps to App Gallery with varying degrees of success. While App Gallery has certainly come a long way in a short period of time, it’s by no means at all a solid replacement for the Play Store.

These efforts, though, paved the way for Huawei’s next flagship phones.

Huawei P40 and Mate 40 series: Still no Google

On March 26, 2020, Huawei unveiled the Huawei P40, P40 Pro, and P40 Pro Plus. The three phones feature all the flagship hardware one would expect from a P series device, including an absolutely incredible rear camera system.

On October 22, 2020, Huawei unveiled the Mate 40, Mate 40 Pro, and Mate 40 Pro Plus. These phones also were marvels when it comes to hardware and design.

Of course, none of the phones had Google apps. All the hardware in the world can’t make up for that.

As with the Mate 30 series, the P40 and Mate 40 series received great reviews. Once again, though, most publications — including Android Authority — advised against buying the phones due to the lack of Google services.

Huawei’s sales peak and then slide

You might think that throughout 2020 Huawei would have been struggling to stay afloat. However, Huawei actually made good on its promise and passed Samsung as the number one smartphone manufacturer as assessed by units shipped.

How is this possible? As mentioned before, you should never underestimate the power of 1.4 billion Chinese citizens all backing up their beloved homegrown brand. Also, don’t forget that Huawei doesn’t just make smartphones. It also still supplies networking systems to multiple countries all around the world.

However, Huawei couldn’t sustain that momentum forever. By the end of 2020, the company saw its market share dwindle. Samsung once again became the world’s largest smartphone manufacturer. Meanwhile, 2021 proved to be a dismal year for Huawei’s smartphone division. Huawei dropped out of the top-five smartphone OEMs by the end of Q1 2021 and limited the Huawei P50 series to China only. Now, in 2023, Huawei is not even in the top ten of global smartphone manufacturers.

Huawei ban brings the end of Kirin chipsets

Unlike a lot of smartphone manufacturers, Huawei almost exclusively uses its own chipsets in its smartphones and tablets. Its line of Kirin processors are designed by Huawei and then produced by a company called TSMC.

At first, TSMC assured Huawei — and the tech industry in general — that it would continue to produce Huawei’s Kirin chipsets. However, it rolled back on that declaration, likely because the Huawei ban was now in full effect (i.e., all the extensions are over).

Without TSMC, Huawei is essentially unable to create Kirin chipsets. At first, we assumed the Mate 40 would be the final phone launched with a Kirin chipset. However, rumors abounded that the 2021 Huawei P50 could have the same Kirin processor as the Mate 40. It turns out that Huawei went half-and-half, with some P50 models having leftover Kirin chips while others have Qualcomm chips.

There aren’t many other companies out there that could create processors for Huawei that don’t involve US-based companies or equipment. The only real option is MediaTek, a Taiwanese firm. As such, it’s very likely we’ll see Huawei flagships with MediaTek chips in the future.

Huawei sells off HONOR sub-brand

Although Huawei’s sub-brand HONOR operated semi-independently, it was still officially part of the Huawei family. This meant that the effects of the Huawei ban carried over to it. In November 2020, Huawei sold off HONOR to a Chinese company called Shenzhen Zhixin New Information Technology Co.

In an official statement on the matter, Huawei attributed the quick sale to the “tremendous pressure” it’s under from the US government.

With the completion of this sale, HONOR will have no direct connection to Huawei. This will free it up to act as its own brand without any of the limitations related to the US sanctions.

In late January 2021, HONOR launched its first phone since leaving Huawei: the HONOR V40. However, it and a few other phones it launched since are China-exclusive. HONOR said the HONOR Magic 3 series would have Google apps onboard and land in Western countries. That never happened, however. It said the same thing in 2022 for the Magic 4 series but actually followed through this time. HONOR’s most recent phone is the Magic 5 series, launched in early 2023. The series comes with Google apps.

21 and beyond: Can Huawei survive?

Huawei has had a rocky time since May 15, 2019, to put it mildly. So far, it’s weathered the storm pretty well. However, how long can it keep the ship afloat with so much stacked against it?

Huawei knows that no matter what, the Huawei-US ban can’t touch its Chinese business. The company is so beloved in China that it could become a China-only brand and survive handily for decades. Huawei isn’t the kind of company that would roll over that easily, though.

As far as we can tell, Huawei plans to move forward with its usual plans of releasing at least one major flagship phone each year as well as other smaller launches whenever it’s appropriate. It can’t use Google apps, but it can still use Android. The Play Store is off-limits, but App Gallery is getting stronger. It can’t make its own processors, but there are other companies from which it can buy chips.

The question then becomes how long the company can keep this up before the smartphone division loses more money than it makes. But don’t write Huawei off — it’s already proven it can survive things that many other companies couldn’t.

Do you currently own a Huawei phone?

If you currently own a Huawei or HONOR phone, you might have some questions about how the Huawei ban affects you. Below are some frequently asked questions.

Huawei is almost certainly tracking how you use your device — but every smartphone company does this. Smartphone OEMs want to know how often you unlock your phone, how often you charge it, how often you open certain apps, etc., so they can use that info to make better products. However, do not be scared that Huawei is actively monitoring you specifically for nefarious purposes. There has never been any evidence to support this claim.

It’s not illegal to own a Huawei device anywhere in the world. The Huawei ban prevents Huawei from working with US-based companies in the creation of its products. It doesn’t apply to consumers who currently own a Huawei product and doesn’t prevent them from buying new ones, either.

As long as there are no laws in your location preventing it, you’re free to sell your Huawei device. Trump’s executive order says nothing about reselling used Huawei products.

You don’t need to worry about this. Although your phone obviously won’t last forever, Huawei will not “brick” your device. You can continue using it for as long as it’s physically capable.

This is a tricky question. If you own a Google-less Huawei device launched after June 2019, you’ll continue to see Android upgrades and security patches as usual. In fact, Huawei has a roadmap for the rollout of EMUI 11 (based on Android 10). Eventually, those phones will receive Harmony OS and get even more updates, supposedly. However, if you own a Huawei phone with Google services onboard launched before May 2019, the Huawei ban prevents the company from issuing Google-sanctioned updates going forward. Huawei has iterated its commitment to delivering patches and upgrades moving forward in spite of this, but there are no long-term guarantees.

Yes. Many companies offer apps and services that do this for you, including Samsung and OnePlus, for example. Keep in mind that some forms of data and some apps won’t be available across different devices, but almost all of your data will transfer successfully.

Please recycle your smartphone using the proper methods. This is a great resource for ethically disposing of your used electronics.

Should you avoid buying Huawei phones or other products?

Huawei has already released multiple high-profile smartphones since the Huawei-US ban took effect. We fully expect there to be more phones on the way, too. As such, you might want to buy a Huawei phone even though the ban would prevent it from being a “normal” experience.

Here are the answers to some questions you might have about buying a new Huawei device.

Yes, it is perfectly legal to buy new Huawei products of all kinds. The Huawei ban only prevents Huawei from working with US-based companies. This might affect the hows and wheres of buying a Huawei phone, but it has no effect on your purchase or ownership of the device.

Yes, you can do all those things and more. The only difference will be the apps you use to perform those functions will probably be different than the ones you currently use. For example, Google Chrome will not be available on new Huawei phones, so you’ll need to use a different app for browsing the web. Huawei’s app store (called App Gallery) will have many of the apps you need.

You can sideload Android apps onto Huawei phones and a lot of them will work correctly. However, many prominent apps use something called Google Play Services to function. This Google product won’t be on new Huawei phones. There are several methods that have been used to successfully sideload Google Play Services on Huawei phones, but these are extremely unofficial, could potentially damage your phone, have no guarantee of working long-term, and potentially leave your device open to security risks. We do not recommend using this as a viable solution.

Huawei is spending millions of dollars on convincing app developers to port their products to App Gallery. As such, there are a lot of Android apps already available through App Gallery. Huawei adds more all the time. You can install App Gallery on your current Android phone and search for the apps you depend on the most, which should help you decide if it can fully replace the Play Store.

Yes, in almost all cases. Huawei devices still run on Android and Bluetooth is a cross-platform service, so everything should function as you would expect. Obviously, there’s no way to say every single device will work perfectly, but most everything should work.

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Limited time or while stocks last. Saving repayable if you end your eligible plan within 12 months. Device RRP 1679. Phone balance repayable when you end your eligible Plan. Gift: One per purchase, redeem at http://oppopromotions.co.nz. Colour may vary. Delivery may take up to 28 days. See 2degrees.nz for full TCs.

iPhone 300 off interest free offer

Limited time or while stocks last. New customers purchasing interest free on a 60 Pay Monthly Plan. Saving repayable if you end your eligible plan within 12 months. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. 2degrees reserves the right to cancel or amend this offer at any time. Plan and Promotion TCs apply. See 2degrees.nz for full TCs.

OPPO A57s Gift With Purchase Offer

Available for a limited time or while stocks last. Available when you purchase interest free on a 35 Pay Monthly Plan. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. One gift per eligible transaction. Redeem gift at oppopromotions.co.nz by 16.04.23. Delivery may take up to 28 days. Plan and Promotion TCs apply. See 2degrees.nz for full TCs.

OPPO Reno8 Lite Gift With Purchase Offer

Available for a limited time or while stocks last. Available when you purchase interest free on a 35 Pay Monthly Plan. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. One gift per eligible transaction. Redeem gift at oppopromotions.co.nz by 16.04.23. Delivery may take up to 28 days. Plan and Promotion TCs apply. See 2degrees.nz for full TCs.

OPPO Find X5 or X5 Pro 200 off interest free offer:

Available for a limited time or while stocks last. New customers only. Available when you purchase interest free on a 35 Pay Monthly Plan. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. One gift per eligible transaction. Redeem gift at oppopromotions.co.nz by 16.04.23. Delivery may take up to 28 days. Plan and Promotion TCs apply. See 2degrees.nz for full TCs

Samsung S22 series and Z series Promotion:

Trade in on selected Smart phones only. Offer available for a limited time or while stocks last. Saving available to new customers purchasing interest free on a 60 Pay Monthly Plan. Trade In Boost available to customer purchasing interest free on a 35 Pay Monthly Plan. Saving and Boost repayable if you end your eligible plan within 12 months. Boost is on top of the Trade In value of your old phone. Phone must meet Trade In criteria including being fully functioning with no cracks or damage that goes beyond normal wear and tear. Trade In, Interest Free, Plan and Promotion TCs apply. See 2degrees.nz for full TCS.

65 worth of Freebies on eligible prepay phone deals:

Limited time only or while stocks last. Available on phones 89. Credit for new customers only.

Plan valid for 1 month, auto renews with enough credit. Min 10 Top Up applies. Scratch the code on your phone box enter it online at 2degreesmobile.co.nz/redeem or text 229 by 01/03/2023. Plan and Promotion TCs apply.

A77 5G Offer:

Phone 5G capable. 5G only available in selected limited areas of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, see 2degrees.nz/coverage for details. Offer available for a limited time or while stock lasts. Saving available when you purchase interest free on a Pay Monthly plan. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. We reserve the right to cancel or amend this offer at any time. Plan, Promotion and Interest Free TCs apply.

A73 5G Offer:

Phone 5G capable. 5G only available in selected limited areas of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, see 2degrees.nz/coverage for details. Offer available for a limited time or while stock lasts. Saving available when you purchase interest free on a Pay Monthly plan. Phone balance repayable if you end your eligible plan. We reserve the right to cancel or amend this offer at any time. Plan, Promotion and Interest Free TCs apply.

Endless Data Plans

Max speeds reduce each after Max speed plan allowance 100GB/m of free hour data^. Fair Use Policy applies. ^At reduced speeds experience is impacted. Max data speeds reduce each: after allocated Max speed Data plan to 1.2Mbps; and after 100GB/m of free data to 1Mbps, hotspotting speeds may be reduced further during periods of congestion. TCs apply.

Trade-In and get an account credit offer (online and Telesales only):

Trade-in selected phones and get a mobile account credit loaded onto your 2degrees mobile account when you purchase new a phone interest through a 2degrees Sales Channel and submit your request via our Online Trade In platform. Maximum of two phones can be traded in per purchase. Trade-in value varies by phone make and model and must be in good working condition, fully functioning with no damage, cracks or other defects that go beyond normal wear tear. One trade in transaction per Account per qualifying campaign. Account credit should be applied to your 2degrees mobile account within 15 days once the phone has been received, evaluated and final value accepted. We reserve the right to amend or cancel this offer at any time. For more detail or to apply for a Trade In visit www.2degrees.nz/NZ/2degrees.

Trade-In and Save offer (Instore Interest free only):

Trade-in selected phones and get an instant discount off your new interest free phone. Maximum of two phones can be traded in per interest free purchase. Trade-in value varies by phone make and model and must be in good working condition, fully functioning with no damage, cracks or other defects that go beyond normal wear tear. Trade-in value(s) will be taken off new device price at sign up when purchased interest free. No refunds or account credits. Minimum of 120 must be owing on interest free when trading in two selected phones. One trade in transaction per Account per qualifying campaign. We reserve the right to amend or cancel this offer at any time. For more details speak to one of our team instore.

What does Huawei’s trade ban mean for your present or future Huawei phone?

The Chinese giant has been blacklisted by the US in the latest skirmish of the ongoing trade war. we’ve updated our advice for those who have a Huawei phone or who might want to buy one in the future.

Readers like you help support.lint. When you make a purchase using links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Read

In May 2019, Huawei was subject to a US trade ban which meant it couldn’t work with some of its long-term partners. It had wide-reaching effects on the company, cutting its ties with companies it relied on for a lot of its technologies.

The biggest change for consumers, however, was that Huawei could no longer work with Google, and that meant no more phones running full versions of Android with Google Play Services. So no Google Play Store, Google Maps, Photos, Gmail or any other default and necessary apps many Android users rely on.

No new phone launched since that initial ban has had these services apart from the P30 Pro New Edition (May 2020) which is, essentially, an upgraded P30 Pro rather than a new phone.

Initially seen as a symptom of the Trump administration in the US, it’s clear that revisiting China trade issues isn’t going to be among President Biden’s top priorities.

These Huawei phones don’t have Google services

Essentially, anything launched since May 2019 won’t have any Google Maps. That means the Huawei P50 series, Nova 9, Mate X2, Huawei P40 and P40 Pro, Mate 40 series, Mate 30 series, Mate XS and Honor 30 series don’t have any Google apps. They rely on Huawei apps and the App Gallery download store, which. while improving constantly. are still missing a number of popular apps and services.

In particular things like many online banking apps and specific services aren’t currently catered for, although Huawei is making a huge effort to improve this.

New Huawei phones do come with Android-based software (with Huawei’s HarmonyOS 2.0 or EMUI user interface on top). But you can only install Google apps via a relatively convoluted and dodgy process and neither Huawei or Google officially recommend this.

The story so far

In May 2019 it was announced by the US government that Google and US businesses have to change the way they deal with Huawei. The Chinese giant was blacklisted by the US in the latest skirmish of the ongoing trade war.

Google was particularly vociferous that preventing Huawei using its version of Android could potentially result in national security issues through people using a Huawei-developed replacement OS. now revealed to be HarmonyOS. In reality, it’s probably because non-Android phones would hit Google profits.

On 29 June 2019, President Trump said he had agreed to allow US tech companies like Google and Qualcomm to once again start selling to Huawei following the restart of trade talks between the US and China. The caveat is that it’s only for goods not connected to national security. Trump made the Комментарии и мнения владельцев at a press conference at the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan. The move seemed to be a reaction to the fact US companies were feeling the effect of the ban.

On 1 August 2019 Trump appeared to contradict his earlier statement (for a change), we’re not allowing Huawei into our country, we’re not changed on that. This would have shown a stronger stance had he not immediately clarified it with we can do business on non-security things with Huawei, we can do that. On 5 September Trump stated again that Huawei is a big concern of our military, of our intelligence agencies, and we are not doing business with Huawei.

Around this time, Huawei and Honor devices were added back onto the Android Enterprise Recommended website. That’s significant as Google is actively recommending them to businesses for long-term use.

Huawei filed a lawsuit against the US telecoms regulator (the FCC) as it has banned US carriers from buying Huawei gear with subsidies paid by the FCC to carries to guarantee access to telco services continue to be available right across the US.

In January 2020 the Trump administration signed a trade agreement with China which saw a thawing of the trade war, but there was no provision for Huawei in the agreement. It’s thought that a second deal is on the table but there isn’t a consensus on whether this will help or hinder Huawei.

The US Department of Commerce has dumped plans to introduce rules to mak it harder for American companies to deal with Huawei. presumably because of the damage to US businesses. As we mentioned, Google is not a fan of the trade ban. It does, however, show that different parts of the US Government can’t agree on a united plan of dealing with the company.

In late 2019, the Department of Commerce said it had received around 300 license requests for continuing to deal with Huawei and has approved arrange a quarter of them.

On 14 May 2020 it was announced the Trump administration had extended the original trade ban for another year until May 2021 stopping US companies from purchasing or using telecommunications equipment made by firms considered a national security risk.

huawei, contract, deals, hello

A temporary license the enabled Huawei to continue making software updates for existing phones, expired on 17 August 2020, though security updates look to be exempt. Part of its reason for existence was to enable rural network operators in the US to continue receiving updates for the Huawei hardware built into its cell towers. However, for most consumers, it’s the effects on the smartphone side of things that will be most keenly felt. The expiration means Google can’t provide updates either.

Further sanctions in August 2020 effectively cut off Huawei’s supply of chips, including the tech it needs to make its own KIrin phone chips and other chips it makes. As CNN notes, analysts called the move a lethal blow.

Trump’s defeat in November 2020 raised Huawei’s hopes that the incoming Biden administration could soften its approach. However, several outlets. like the Washington Post. have reported that Biden is likely to remain tough on Chinese tech. Indeed it quotes an early 2020 article from Biden that says The United States does need to get tough with China. If China has its way, it will keep robbing the United States and American companies of their technology and intellectual property,

Also in November, US company Qualcomm received a license to supply Huawei with some 4G chips. perhaps a taste of things to come. joining also US-based Intel and Microsoft in being able to supply Huawei. It certainly seems as though a US goal of creating an advantage for its companies is beginning to take effect.

Before leaving office, it appeared that the Trump administration-led Commerce Department intended to deny a significant number of license requests for exports to Huawei and a revocation of at least one previously issued license.

White House to introduce rule stopping government deals with Huawei

As we mentioned earlier, it doesn’t seem that China trade will be an issue President Biden will prioritise given there are more pressing situations. Janet Yellen, Biden’s pick to lead the Treasury Department, has already promised action on China’s abusive, unfair and illegal practices according to CNN.

On 16 June 2021 Honor launched its first phone as an independent brand. Having previously been a subsidiary of Huawei. very much focused on western markets where Google Play Services are essential. it was separated from its parent company so that it could once again build and sell phones with a full version of Android onboard. It’s sinch launched a few new handsets, including its first foldable: the Magic V.

How does Huawei feel about the situation?

At the Mate 30 launch in September 2019, Huawei CEO Richard Yu told.lint that Huawei could push Google apps to affected devices overnight if the ban was lifted but said that he felt the phone will still sell well in many territories, especially China of course (we’ve been led to believe this is the case).

He also opened up on his feelings about the ban. It’s not good for US companies, it’s not good [for us]…in the past we [made] a big contribution to US companies. And now it’s not allowed to use…it’s damaging to US companies’ business.

We are very open and transparent. We are a globalised company. In the US-China trade war we have become a bargaining chip.

We didn’t want to do this…we were forced to do this. We have a good partnership with Google but the US Government forced us to do this. I hope you guys [journalists] can understand this.

On 18 May 2020, Huawei issued a strongly-worded statement hitting out at the latest proposed measures to stop it using US technologies at all, including in the manufacture of chips inside its other products.

In its relentless pursuit to tighten its stranglehold on our company, the US government has decided to proceed and completely ignore the concerns of many companies and industry associations, said the statement.

This new rule will impact the expansion, maintenance, and continuous operations of networks worth hundreds of billions of dollars that we have rolled out in more than 170 countries.

The US is leveraging its own technological strengths to crush companies outside its own borders. This will only serve to undermine the trust international companies place in US technology and supply chains. Ultimately, this will harm US interests.

Now that it’s running on three years since the original ban, Huawei’s efforts have been firmly behind building its own ecosystem of products and services, all tied together using the HarmonyOS platform. It’s acting and planning as if the Google partnership will never return, although it has spun off Honor as an independent company, so that Honor can work on building Android phones again, without the restrictions placed on its former parent company.

How does this relate to the Huawei 5G issue in the UK?

Australia and Japan have blocked Huawei from involvement in 5G networks, but the UK Government saw no reason to do the same in January 2020, limiting its involvement in an individual mobile network to less than 35 per cent of the non-core network.

However, the sands shifted. on 15 May 2020 the US Commerce Department outlined further restrictive measures on Huawei to restrict it from making chips using US technologies using American-based IP or even equipment. The new rules mean that Huawei would need a license to use any US tech. Huawei had tried to ‘indigenize’ some of its design processes within the US to circumvent the original ban which clearly the US didn’t like.

This ruling has had a huge effect because it forced the UK Government into reversing its earlier decision on Huawei 5G network gear. The UK has now said telcos can’t use Huawei 5G network gear after 2027 and need to stop buying new equipment by the end of 2020. There’s a deadline on installing this of September 2021.

The US telecoms regulator – the FCC – also recently designated Huawei and ZTE as ‘national security threats’ but, as with the trade ban, has not released any evidence to this effect publicly.

The UK may have been backed into a corner. The UK needs a US trade deal in the post-Brexit world and further restrictions on Huawei seems like it would be a pre-requisite.

What does the trade ban mean for existing Huawei devices?

Existing pre-May 2019 Huawei devices like the P30 Series (including the P30 Pro New Edition), P20 Series and Mate 20 Series are unaffected in their current form. No apps will disappear and they can continue to use Google apps and get security updates. Because Honor is a subsidiary of Huawei, the same implications would apply to its older handsets, too.

Google is clear on this point: For users of our services, Google Play and the security protections from Google Play Protect will continue to function on existing Huawei devices.

For its part, Huawei says it will continue to provide security updates and after-sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products covering those which have been sold or are still in stock globally.

What wasn’t clear for a time was whether Huawei and Honor handsets would get feature updates. But we now know the following devices are getting the upgrade to Android 10 during 2020. So the owners of these phones need not worry at all about this situation.

  • P30 Pro
  • P30 Huawei
  • Mate 20 Huawei
  • Mate 20 Pro
  • Mate 20 RS
  • P30 lite
  • P Smart 2019
  • P Smart 2019
  • P Smart Z
  • Mate 20 X
  • Mate 20 X 5G
  • P20 Pro
  • P20
  • Mate 10 Pro
  • Porsche Design Mate 10
  • Mate 10
  • Mate 20 Lite
  • Honor 8X
  • Honor 10
  • Honor 20
  • Honor 20i/20 Lite
  • Honor 20 Pro

19 January 2022 update: Update with more current view of the Honor/Huawei situation

21 January 2021 update: Post-inauguration of President Biden with latest details.

1 December update: Updated post-US Election.

30 May update: Added extra links and context about the ongoing situation.

11 June update: Added new developments from Google and UK operators.

20 June update: Added information about devices getting Android Q update

1 July update: Added information on Trump’s G20 statement and new Huawei statement

9 August update: Major rework after the announcement of HarmonyOS

12 August update: Android Enterprise information added

30 August update: Added latest info from Reuters

9 September update: Added Mate 30 information from IFA 2019

18 September update: Added latest Mate 30 information

20 September update: Added Mate 30 launch information and Richard Yu quotes

11 November update: Added latest situation on US-China trade talks

6 December update: Added latest information

20 January update 2020: Added latest information including trade deal developments

13 March update: Refined information

28 April update: Added latest information

14 May update: Updated with latest Trump ban

Dan Grabham is the former associate editor at.lint working across features, news and reviews and has extensive experience writing about computing, mobile and internet topics. He’s a regular at tech shows like CES, Mobile World Congress (MWC) and IFA as well as other launches and events. Based near Bath, UK, Dan stepped up to.lint from T3.com where he relaunched the UK lifestyle and technology site after a spell launching and editing Lifehacker UK. He was also part of the team that launched TechRadar where he rose to deputy editor. Dan has also written for a huge amount of magazines and websites including The Big Issue, MacFormat, Maximum PC, Official Playstation magazine and Web User. He has also written a book, 1000 Life Hacks, featuring lifestyle tips and tricks across various topics including tech, parenting, fashion, home and DIY. As a tech pundit, Dan has also been quizzed and quoted for a wide variety places including BBC World Service and News Online, Sky News Swipe, The Sun, BBC Radios 4 and 5Live and has also been interviewed on Channel 4 News, ITV News and Sky News. Dan has also given talks on upcoming tech trends. Dan is completely platform agnostic, equally at home on Windows, macOS, Android and iOS and uses all four on a regular basis. In his spare time, Dan enjoys spending time with his family, watching sport and drinking beer. He doesn’t run or cycle as much as he should.

What’s On Offer With Huawei?

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Huawei’s been in the news for all the wrong reasons – but it still makes some pretty decent smartphones. Here’s a round-up of its latest handsets, Huawei Mate 40 Pro and Huawei Mate P40 Pro.

A need-to-know

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro holds its own against flagship phones from rivals Apple and Samsung. But the downside is that you’ll have to live without Google.

Why? Huawei has repeatedly been accused — although there’s no hard evidence — of using its products to spy on other nations.

Its close ties to the Chinese government mean that Huawei, along with several other Chinese companies, have been put on the USA’s Entity List. And companies on this list are banned from doing business with any organisation that operates in the US.

This means Huawei phones can’t run Google Mobile Services and don’t have the Google Play Store. It makes them something of a leftfield option for UK consumers who typically use a multitude of Google apps.

Read on to find out whether, despite this potentially major stumbling block, one of Huawei’s latest handsets might be right for you.

Compare Huawei Phone Contract Deals

Choose from the best Huawei smartphone deals with our easy-to-use comparison service

Huawei Mate 40 Pro

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro is the Chinese firm’s latest offering. It comes with a 6.76 inch screen, boasting 16.7 million colours, with a ‘rounded corners’ design on the display.

The screen has a punch hole camera in the top left-hand corner, noticeably larger than the punch hole cameras on comparable devices. It has a dual SIM slot — the first slot supports a nano SIM, while the second supports either a nano SIM or eSIM.

The Mate 40 Pro comes with 8GB RAM and a massive 256GB ROM. If that’s not enough storage, you can expand it by using the nano memory slot.

The Mate 40 Pro is rated IP68 for water and dust resistance, which means it should cope with up to 1.5 metres of water for up to 30 minutes.

It packs a punch when it comes to power, too. It’s powered by the Kirin 9,000 chip, the industry’s first 5nm chipset with a built-in 5G modem. It has both a Dual Big Core Tiny Core NPU (neural-network processing unit). So it’s the perfect device for gamers looking for a hitch-free experience.

Software-wise, the Mate 40 Pro runs on EMUI 11. You can multi-task to your heart’s content and use air gestures to control the phone without touching it.

Camera-wise, the Huawei Mate 40 Pro is up there with the best of them. The rear camera has 50 MP Ultra Vision, 20 MP Cine Camera, and a 12 MP Telephoto Camera. It also has an Ultra Vision Selfie Camera which allows you to take images in ultra-wide and standard field of view images.

The front camera has a 13MP lens, a 3D Depth Sensing Camera, and 4K video.

The handset comes with an impressive array of sensors including 3D Face Recognition, gesture sensor, gyroscope, compass, an ambient light sensor, and a proximity sensor.

Charging is via the Huawei SuperCharge (included) or the Wireless Huawei Quick Charge (not included). The typical battery is 4400 mAh.

What do you get in the box?

Flexible Clear Case (dependent on market)

How does the Huawei Mate 40 Pro compare to previous models?

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro follows on from the P40 range, which comprises of the P40, P40 Pro, P40 Lite 5G, and P40 Lite. If you already own a phone from the Huawei’s P40 range, you might be wondering whether to upgrade.

Looking at the top dog phone in the previous range, the P40 Pro, the Mate 40 Pro is slightly bigger and heavier.

The Mate 40 Pro has a bigger display at 6.76 inches to the P40 Pro’s 6.58 inches. Both support 90Hz refresh rate for smooth performance. The P40 Pro resolution is 1200 x 2640 pixels versus 1344 x 2772 on the Mate 40 Pro.

The Mate 40 Pro has stereo sound from dual speakers, to the P40 Pro’s mono speaker.

But the cameras are almost identical. Both have a 50MP main camera, and 12MP periscope lens, and ultra-wide cameras. The main difference camera-wise is that the Mate 40 Pro has a wide angle lens, whereas the P40 Pro doesn’t. Both support 4K video on the front camera but the Mate 40 Pro front camera also supports slow motion video.

The Mate 40 Pro’s has wireless charging at 50W – faster than the P40 Pro’s wired charging at 40W. So it if’s a quick charge you’re after, it might be worth investing in the latest model.

No Google Mobile Services

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro runs on Android 10 Open-Source, using Huawei Mobile Services and the latest EMUI 11.0. This means that Google Mobile Services are not integrated.

But Huawei is quick to point out that users have access to many popular applications via the Huawei Phone Clone, AppGallery and Petal Search tool.

The big question, of course, is: Can you live without Google? The truth is, the latest Huawei phones are not the choice for anyone whose life is integrated with Google apps such as Gmail and Maps, but also third-party apps that rely on Google’s Play Services infrastructure to work.

Huawei Teasing Futuristic New Smartphone

Search engine-wise, you can always use Bing however.

How much can you expect to pay for the latest Huawei phones?

The advertised from Huawei are:

Before you make a decision, you should have a look at deals for different handsets here.

How should you pay for a Huawei Mate 40 Pro?

At more than a grand, the Huawei Mate 40 Pro isn’t cheap and pretty much your only option is to buy it outright from Huawei.

If you want to spread the cost, you could buy a Mate 40 Pro with a 0% purchase credit card which allows you to spread the cost of your payments over a period of up to 20 months interest-free.

You should aim to clear your balance before the 0% deal ends, to avoid paying any interest at all.

Once you’ve bought your handset, you can then take advantage of a cheap SIM-only deal which will give you a monthly allowance of calls, texts and data for a fixed price.

If you opt for the Huawei P40 Pro instead, you could get one via a bundled ‘pay monthly’ contract. This means the cost of the handset, plus a set amount of data, texts and minutes are all wrapped up in one package for a fixed monthly price.

Get the right protection

All Huawei smartphones come with a 24-month manufacturer’s warranty. The charger is covered for six months, and the USB charging cable three months.

You’ll need the original retail purchase receipt to get repairs done under the warranty.

Compare Huawei Phone Contract Deals

Choose from the best Huawei smartphone deals with our easy-to-use comparison service